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Robotic Training for Stroke Neurorehabilitation

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02639390
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : December 24, 2015
Last Update Posted : December 15, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
VA Office of Research and Development

Brief Summary:
The overall goal is to further develop a robotic exoskeleton for neurorehabilitation of arm function after stroke. The investigators previously developed a novel training protocol that combined the ARMin and HandSOME exoskeletons. This is one of only a few arm exoskeletons that allow coordinated whole limb training in reach and grasp tasks with both virtual and real objects. However, the robot has a very large inertia and friction, and only gross grasp patterns are available. In development work, the investigators will significantly modify the AMRin and HandSOME to deliver a state-of-the-art lightweight robotic exoskeleton capable of retraining a wide range of functional activities. In the subsequent testing phase, a clinical trial will examine the effects of robotic training in chronic stroke subjects.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Stroke Device: Robotic Therapy Other: Conventional Therapy Phase 2

Detailed Description:
In a pilot clinical trial, the investigators found that the current robotic exoskeleton elicited improvements in arm function that can potentially supplement conventional methods to improve outcomes. However, the robot has a very large inertia and friction, and only gross grasp patterns are available. Therefore, improvements in movement speed and fine grasp were limited after robotic training. In development work, the investigators will significantly modify the ARMin and HandSOME to deliver a state-of-the-art lightweight robotic exoskeleton capable of retraining a wide range of functional activities. The investigators will reduce the inertia and friction of the robot to 1/4 of current values, incorporate an adaptive algorithm to automatically adjust assistance levels and extend the range of grasp patterns to include power grasp, thumb-index finger pinch and key pinch. Using the improved device from the development activities, the investigators will perform a clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of robotic training to conventional therapy from an occupational therapist. To take advantage of the facilitatory effect of robot therapy on subsequent conventional therapy, the experimental treatment will be 12 hours of robot therapy followed by 12 hours of conventional therapy. Chronic stroke subjects (N=38) will be randomly assigned to receive this experimental treatment or 24 hours of conventional therapy from an occupational therapist.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 38 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Task-Specific Upper-Extremity Robotic Training for Stroke Neurorehabilitation
Estimated Study Start Date : June 1, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 31, 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 31, 2019

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Robotic
The experimental group will receive 1-hour robotic training sessions, 3 times per week for a total of 12 sessions supervised by a research assistant. Immediately following this robot training, these subjects will receive the same dosage and schedule (1-hour sessions, 3 times/week, 12 total sessions) of conventional one-on-one therapy from an occupational therapist.
Device: Robotic Therapy
Subjects will be placed in the robot and practice common upper extremity tasks involving grasping, manipulating and moving objects.
Other: Conventional Therapy
An occupational therapist will provide one-on-one individualized programs focused on arm function. Treatment will focus on practice of specific tasks, such as reach, grasp, transport and release of various objects between different targets. Progression is done by varying the shape, size and weight of objects, altering the end range of the target or increasing the speed of movement.
Active Comparator: Conventional
Subjects will receive 24 hours of one-on-one treatment from an occupational therapist. The treatment schedule will parallel that given to the experimental group (1-hour sessions, 3 times/week).
Other: Conventional Therapy
An occupational therapist will provide one-on-one individualized programs focused on arm function. Treatment will focus on practice of specific tasks, such as reach, grasp, transport and release of various objects between different targets. Progression is done by varying the shape, size and weight of objects, altering the end range of the target or increasing the speed of movement.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Fugl-Meyer score [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 8 weeks ]
    The Fugl-Meyer Test of Motor Function will be used to assess motor impairments at the shoulder, elbow, wrist and fingers. The Fugl-Meyer test scores reflexes and the ability to perform several movements and tasks on a 3-point scale. The Fugl-Meyer was designed for the recovery patterns observed after stroke and is very responsive to change in severe and moderately impaired subjects.

  2. Change in Action Research Arm Test [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 8 weeks ]
    The Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) is an impairment level measurement tool that assesses the functional limitations of the upper extremities. It is one of the most frequently used primary endpoints in upper extremity (UE) training trials in stroke. The assessment incorporates 19 items that are divided into four subscales: Grasp, Grip, Pinch, and Gross movement. Item scores are summed to form a subtest score, and then a full-scale score.

  3. Change in Motor Activity Log [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 8 weeks ]
    The Motor Activity Log (MAL) will be used to assess use of the limb at home. It is a structured interview during which respondents are asked to rate how they use their more-impaired arm for 28 activities of daily living (ADL) in the home over a specified period. Activities include brushing teeth, buttoning a shirt or blouse, and eating with a fork or spoon.

  4. Change in Fugl-Meyer score at follow-up [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 8 months ]
    The Fugl-Meyer Test of Motor Function will be used to assess motor impairments at the shoulder, elbow, wrist and fingers. The Fugl-Meyer test scores reflexes and the ability to perform several movements and tasks on a 3-point scale. The Fugl-Meyer was designed for the recovery patterns observed after stroke and is very responsive to change in severe and moderately impaired subjects.

  5. Change in Action Research Arm Test at follow-up [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 8 months ]
    The Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) is an impairment level measurement tool that assesses the functional limitations of the upper extremities. It is one of the most frequently used primary endpoints in upper extremity (UE) training trials in stroke. The assessment incorporates 19 items that are divided into four subscales: Grasp, Grip, Pinch, and Gross movement. Item scores are summed to form a subtest score, and then a full-scale score.

  6. Change in Motor Activity Log at follow-up [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 8 months ]
    The Motor Activity Log (MAL) will be used to assess use of the limb at home. It is a structured interview during which respondents are asked to rate how they use their more-impaired arm for 28 activities of daily living (ADL) in the home over a specified period. Activities include brushing teeth, buttoning a shirt or blouse, and eating with a fork or spoon.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 21 or older
  • Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (with confirmatory neuroimaging) that occurred more than 6 months before entering the study
  • Presence of voluntary hand activity indicated by a score of at least 1 on the finger mass extension/grasp release item of the Fugl-Meyer Test of Motor Function
  • Adequate cognitive status, as determined by clinical evaluation
  • No upper extremity injury or conditions that limited use prior to the stroke

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Cannot give informed consent
  • Have clinically significant fluctuations in mental status within a month of enrollment
  • Were not independent prior to the stroke as measured by scores <95 on the Barthel Index or >1 on the Modified Rankin Scale
  • Have hemispatial neglect as determined by >3 errors on the Star Cancellation Test
  • Have severe sensory loss as determined by a score of 2 on the sensory item of the NIHSS
  • Receiving oral or injected antispasticity medications during study treatment
  • Pain that interferes with daily activities
  • History of prior stroke

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02639390


Contacts
Contact: Rahsaan Holley, MS (202) 877-1875 rahsaan.holley@medstar.net

Locations
United States, District of Columbia
Washington DC VA Medical Center, Washington, DC Not yet recruiting
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, 20422
Contact: Delphyne Bruner    202-745-8328    Delphyne.Bruner@va.gov   
Principal Investigator: Peter S. Lum, PhD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
VA Office of Research and Development
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Peter S. Lum, PhD Washington DC VA Medical Center, Washington, DC

Responsible Party: VA Office of Research and Development
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02639390     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: A1966-R
First Posted: December 24, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 15, 2017
Last Verified: December 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Product Manufactured in and Exported from the U.S.: No

Keywords provided by VA Office of Research and Development:
Robotics
upper extremity
neurorehabilitation
movement therapy

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Stroke
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases