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Efficacy of Recombinant Human Clara Cell 10 Protein (rhCC10) Administered to Premature Neonates With Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01941745
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : September 13, 2013
Last Update Posted : October 12, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Therabron Therapeutics, Inc.
Baystate Medical Center
Ginekologiczno-Położniczy Szpital Kliniczny UM w Poznaniu Katedra Neonatologii
SP ZOZ Szpital Uniwersytecki w Krakowie Oddizat Neonatologii
Instytut Centrum Zdrowia Matki Polki Klinika Neonatologii
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Tufts Medical Center

Brief Summary:

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD) is a multi-factorial disease process that is the end result of an immature, surfactant deficient lung that has been exposed to hyperoxia, mechanical ventilation and infection. These conditions initiate an inflammatory response characterized by elevated inflammatory cell infiltrates and proinflammatory cytokines that lead to the development of significant acute and chronic lung injury.

The study drug, rhCC10, is a recombinant version of natural human CC10 protein. Native CC10 is produced primarily by non-ciliated respiratory epithelial cells, called Clara cells and is the most abundant protein in the mucosal fluids in normal healthy lungs.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability and anti-inflammatory effects of a single intratracheal (IT) dose of rhCC10 to intubated premature infants receiving positive pressure ventilation for treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) to prevent long term respiratory complications referred to as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and, more recently, as chronic respiratory morbidity (CRM; asthma, cough, wheezing, multiple respiratory infections).

CC10 regulates inflammatory responses and protects the structural integrity of pulmonary tissue while preserving pulmonary mechanical function during various insults (eg. viral infection, bacterial endotoxin, ozone, allergens, hyperoxia). Together these properties suggest that administration of rhCC10 may help to facilitate development of normal airway epithelia and prevent the inflammation that leads to CRM in these infants.

This study is funded by the FDA Office of Orphan Product Development (OOPD).


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Premature Infant Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Drug: Half normal saline Drug: Low Dose rhCC10 Drug: High dose rhCC10 Phase 2

Detailed Description:
Recombinant human CC10 protein (rhCC10) is a novel therapeutic agent used to prevent the development of chronic respiratory morbidity (CRM; repeated respiratory infections, asthma, re-hospitalizations) in preterm infants. Native CC10 is a natural anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory factor produced by Clara Cells in the lung and is the most abundant protein in respiratory mucosa. Animal data demonstrate that a single intratracheal dose of rhCC10 administered shortly after birth reduces lung inflammation (important biomarkers linked to lung injury in preterm infants), promotes normal lung development, preserves lung architecture, improves pulmonary function, suppresses the response to endotoxin and enhances resistance to pulmonary infections. In preterm infants who die or develop lung inflammation and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), both the concentration and activity of CC10 are significantly reduced indicating that CC10 is essential for preventing lung injury and promoting normal lung development. In a small phase I study, rhCC10 significantly decreased several indices of pulmonary inflammation in the lungs of premature infants who were at risk of developing BPD and associated CRM. The drug appeared to be safe, well-tolerated, and reduce risk of re-hospitalization due to respiratory illness for 9-10 months after a single intratracheal dose at the time of birth (0/11 rhCC10-treated infants vs. 3/6 placebo-treated). This supports the protective role of rhCC10 against damage from hyperoxia, mechanical ventilation, inflammation, and infection in the immature lung. A more normal airway epithelium will produce significantly more endogenous CC10, with both factors contributing to enhanced resistance to infections, less asthma, and improved long-term respiratory outcome. We propose to conduct a Phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate rhCC10 in extremely premature infants (<29 weeks gestation) for the prevention of BPD and CRM. This will be a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose escalation study in 88 premature infants. A single intratracheal dose of study drug (rhCC10 or placebo) will be administered to preterm infants receiving surfactant and mechanical ventilation for treatment of RDS. Infants will be followed to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, and short and long term efficacy of this approach. Safety will be evaluated through serious adverse event (SAE) and adverse event monitoring and by Bayley neurodevelopmental assessments at 18 months corrected gestational age (CGA). Efficacy measurements will include the primary combined endpoint of alive without evidence of CRM through 12 months CGA (defined by parental diaries and pulmonary questionnaires) comparing rhCC10 treated to placebo controls. The availability of a therapy which prevents lung injury, promotes lung development, and prevents serious respiratory infections and asthma in high risk preterm infants would be a highly significant advancement in care.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 88 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Efficacy of Recombinant Human Clara Cell Protein (rhCC10) Administered to Premature Neonates With Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Study Start Date : October 2013
Estimated Primary Completion Date : February 2018
Estimated Study Completion Date : August 2018


Arm Intervention/treatment
Placebo Comparator: half normal saline
Single dose of half normal saline at 2 ml/kg given intratracheally times one dose
Drug: Half normal saline
2 ml/kg

Experimental: Low Dose rhCC10
1.5 mg/kg study drug (rhCC10)in 2 ml/kg given intratracheally times one dose
Drug: Low Dose rhCC10
1.5 mg/kg study drug (rhCC10)

Experimental: High dose rhCC10
5 mg/kg of rhCC10 given in 2 ml/kg and administered intratracheally times one dose
Drug: High dose rhCC10
5 mg/kg in 2 ml/kg




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Survival without chronic respiratory morbidity (CRM) at 12 months corrected gestational age [ Time Frame: 12 Months Corrected Gestational Age ]
    The primary outcome of the study will be survival without chronic respiratory morbidity (CRM) through 12 months corrected gestational age (CGA) as measured by validated respiratory diaries (presence of wheezing, coughing, and/or respiratory medication use 2 or more days per week for 3 consecutive weeks) and pulmonary questionnaires (decrease in respiratory illness requiring medications, unscheduled medical visits and/or ER or hospital admissions) which have been shown to correlate more closely with abnormalities on pulmonary function testing. The 12 month CGA endpoint has been shown to be more predictive of respiratory morbidity than a diagnosis of BPD at 36 weeks post-menstrual in previous studies of recombinant human superoxide dismutase and high frequency oscillatory ventilation in preterm infants conducted by the clinical investigator's research groups.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Long Term Efficacy [ Time Frame: 6 months corrected gestational age ]
    A secondary outcome of the study will be survival without CRM at 6 months CGA as measured by validated respiratory diaries (presence of wheezing, coughing, or respiratory medication use 2 or more days per week for 3 consecutive weeks) and pulmonary questionnaires (decrease in respiratory illness requiring medications and/or hospitalization) which have been shown to correlate closely with abnormalities on pulmonary function testing. Infants will be also be evaluated at 18 months CGA to evaluate growth and neurological development.

  2. Safety and Efficacy - Adverse Events [ Time Frame: Adverse events are monitored through 36 wks post-menstrual age (PMA) ]
    The safety of the study drug will continue to be assessed by comparing the incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events in the treatment and placebo groups as well as the historical incidence of the adverse events at each institution.

  3. Short term Efficacy [ Time Frame: 36 weeks post-menstrual age ]
    Short term efficacy evaluations will include time on mechanical ventilation, oxygen requirement at 36 weeks post menstrual age, and survival without BPD at 36 weeks post-menstrual age as measured by oxygen challenge testing.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   24 Weeks to 29 Weeks   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age less than or equal to 24 hours;
  • Birth weight 600 - 1250 grams;
  • Gestational age 24-29 weeks (not less than 24 weeks); at birth based on best estimate using obstetrical sonography (first or second trimester), solid dating criteria, or Ballard examination;
  • Birth weight appropriate for gestational age;
  • 5 minute Apgar score >5;
  • Diagnosis of neonatal RDS based on clinical and radiographic criteria;
  • Requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation for treatment of RDS;
  • Received at least one dose of surfactant (prophylaxis or rescue); and
  • Written informed consent is obtained from at least one of the infant's parents or legal guardians (see section 6.2) prior to enrollment of the subject. The parent(s) or legal guardian(s) must agree to all study-related procedures and evaluations.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • 5 minute Apgar score of ≤ 5;
  • Major congenital anomaly (chromosomal, renal, cardiac, hepatic, neurologic, or pulmonary malformations; minor anomalies such as cleft lip/palate are permitted);
  • Evidence of severe neonatal depression (as defined by cord blood acid-base balance (pH) ≤ 7.00 and/or an Apgar score of < 4 at 10 minutes);
  • Evidence of congenital infection;
  • Requires a major surgical procedure prior to administration of Study drug
  • Enrollment in any other study involving administration of another investigational drug;
  • Any condition which could preclude receiving study drug or performing any study-related procedures;
  • Use of postnatal corticosteroids prior to administration of r-hCC10, except as specified in the protocol;
  • Use of inhaled nitric oxide prior to administration of r-hCC10;
  • Mother is known to be seropositive for HIV (per maternal medical records);
  • Parent or guardian is unable or unwilling to complete the study diary;
  • Parent or guardian is unable to bring the infant back to the study center for follow-up evaluations.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01941745


Locations
United States, Massachusetts
Tufts Medical Center
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02111
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02115
Baystate Medical Center
Springfield, Massachusetts, United States, 01199
Sponsors and Collaborators
Tufts Medical Center
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Therabron Therapeutics, Inc.
Baystate Medical Center
Ginekologiczno-Położniczy Szpital Kliniczny UM w Poznaniu Katedra Neonatologii
SP ZOZ Szpital Uniwersytecki w Krakowie Oddizat Neonatologii
Instytut Centrum Zdrowia Matki Polki Klinika Neonatologii
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jonathan Davis, MD Tufts Medical Center
Principal Investigator: Richard Parad, MD/MPH Brigham and Women's Hospital

Responsible Party: Tufts Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01941745     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: rhCC10 Study 2013
Grant #3899 ( Other Grant/Funding Number: FDA OOPD )
First Posted: September 13, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 12, 2017
Last Verified: October 2017

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Syndrome
Premature Birth
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Obstetric Labor, Premature
Obstetric Labor Complications
Pregnancy Complications
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Respiration Disorders
Infant, Premature, Diseases
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury
Lung Injury