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Age-related Longitudinal Changes in Aviator Performance

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01364753
First Posted: June 2, 2011
Last Update Posted: December 6, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jerome A Yesavage,, Stanford University
  Purpose
Our overall goal has been twofold: 1) to evaluate whether there are significant age-related changes in flight simulator performance near age 60, and 2) to assess whether there is an alternative model that can explain longitudinal flight simulator performance on the basis of measures of cognitive function and expertise.

Condition
Memory Impairment

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Ecologic or Community
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Age-related Longitudinal Changes in Aviator Performance

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Jerome A Yesavage,, Stanford University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Aviation-related performance over time. [ Time Frame: longitudinal ]
    Participants "fly" in our computerized flight simulator and perform a set of brief tasks designed to measure reaction time and attention span. The study is longitudinal, collecting information about aviation-related performance over time. There is an initial training period, followed by annual visits. During the training period participants learn how to "fly" the simulator, and performance on certain standard maneuvers will be measured during a maximum of 6 simulated flights. At each annual visit, participants fly two 75-minute simulated flights and may be asked to perform up to four holding patterns and instrument landings.


Biospecimen Retention:   Samples With DNA
saliva

Enrollment: 139
Study Start Date: January 2006
Study Completion Date: December 2014
Primary Completion Date: June 2014 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
Pilots
No intervention; observational study

Detailed Description:
Our overall goal has been twofold: 1) to evaluate whether there are significant age-related changes in flight simulator performance near age 60, and 2) to assess whether there is an alternative model that can explain longitudinal flight simulator performance on the basis of measures of cognitive function and expertise. Such a model might be able to predict change in aviator performance better than what could be predicted by chronological age alone.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   45 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
healthy older pilots holding active airplane license
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:1) licensed aircraft pilot 2) 45 to 70 years of age 3) at least 100 hours of total flight experience 4) current FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) medical certificate of class III or higher

Exclusion Criteria:1) taking psychotropic medications 2) taking other medications with arousal or sedative effects

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01364753


Locations
United States, California
VA Palo Alto Health Care System
Palo Alto, California, United States, 94304
Sponsors and Collaborators
Stanford University
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jerome A Yesavage Stanford University
  More Information

Responsible Party: Jerome A Yesavage,, Professor, Stanford University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01364753     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SU-06302009-2940
R37AG012713 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: May 31, 2011
First Posted: June 2, 2011
Last Update Posted: December 6, 2016
Last Verified: December 2016

Keywords provided by Jerome A Yesavage,, Stanford University:
Memory
Aviation