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Access to Infertility Services: Clinic Perspective

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00782132
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : October 31, 2008
Last Update Posted : April 25, 2016
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):

Study Description
Brief Summary:
Since the identification of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the 1980s, there have been significant advances made in the management and long-term prognosis for infected individuals. Currently, with the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-positive individuals may live a healthy and productive life for years to decades after diagnosis. As life expectancy has increased, this group of people has begun to engage in family planning. This has created a need for access to advanced reproductive technologies and fertility treatments. While attempting to achieve pregnancy, utilization of these services can help to minimize the risk of transmission in serodiscordant couples, and can allow treatment of subfertile couples. Access to these services may be limited in Ontario for a variety of reasons. The purpose of this study is to determine the access to infertility clinics and services in Ontario for couples in which one or both partners is infected with HIV.

Condition or disease
Infertility

Study Design

Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 23 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Access to Infertility Services in Ontario for Couples in Which One or Both Partners is HIV-Positive
Study Start Date : November 2006
Primary Completion Date : May 2008
Study Completion Date : August 2008

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: HIV/AIDS Infertility
U.S. FDA Resources

Groups and Cohorts


Outcome Measures

Eligibility Criteria

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Ontario clinics offering advanced reproductive/infertility services
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All Ontario clinics offering advanced reproductive/infertility services

Exclusion Criteria:

Contacts and Locations

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00782132


Locations
Canada, Ontario
St. Michael's Hospital
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, L5M4K5
Sponsors and Collaborators
St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Mona Loutfy, MD Women's College Research Institute
More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00782132     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: REB 06-248
First Posted: October 31, 2008    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 25, 2016
Last Verified: April 2016

Keywords provided by St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto:
Infertility Services, HIV, pregnancy planning

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Infertility
Genital Diseases, Male
Genital Diseases, Female