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Effect of Consuming Beans for One Month on Blood Lipids, Satiety, Intake Regulation and Body Weight

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00741923
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 26, 2008
Last Update Posted : June 15, 2012
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
G. Harvey Anderson, University of Toronto

Brief Summary:
This project investigates the effect of regular consumption of commercially available processed white beans (5 cups per week) on food intake, body weight, blood pressure, satiety hormones and glycemic response over a 4-week period. We have chosen to provide participants with canned white beans, the most accessible and frequently consumed bean in North America. They are inexpensive, a good source of high quality nutrients and ready to eat. Based upon published literature and short-term studies conducted in our laboratory, we hypothesize that regular consumption of commercially available canned beans will increase satiety and improve the control of food intake, body weight, blood glucose and blood lipids.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Overweight Obesity Metabolic Syndrome Diabetes Hypertension Other: navy beans added to regular diet Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of chronic disease risk factors, including abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure and elevated fasting blood glucose.

A main treatment for metabolic syndrome is lifestyle modification (alterations in diet and/or physical activity patterns) resulting in weight loss.

Beans are easily incorporated into the diet and may lead to the attainment and maintenance of healthy a body weight and improved metabolic control.

Canned baked navy beans (with tomato sauce) have a low glycemic response following consumption, however, whether this effect has long-term benefits on glycemic control requires further investigation.

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effect of consuming 5 cups per week of commercially available canned navy beans over 4 weeks on risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome.

Subjects

Inclusion criteria: Men and women (n=16) between 35 and 55 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) of 27 to 40 kg/m2.

Exclusion criteria: smoking or any major surgery/medical condition within the last 6 months, use of medications that could interfere with the study outcomes, gastrointestinal, liver or kidney disease and women who were pregnant/lactating


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 14 participants
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Beans and Potatoes in the Regulation of Food Intake and Risk Factors for Chronic Diseases. Effect of Consuming Beans for One Month on Blood Lipids, Satiety, Intake Regulation and Body Weight
Study Start Date : November 2007
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 2008
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2009

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Body Weight

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Bean group
A group consuming 5 cups/week of navy beans for a month
Other: navy beans added to regular diet
5 cups per week of commercially available white beans for 4-weeks
Other Name: Heinz beans




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. body weight, waist circumference, blood glucose, satiety hormones, and blood lipids, inflammation factor, and glycated haemoglobin [ Time Frame: at the beginning and at the end of study ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   35 Years to 55 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • BMI 27-40 kg/m2

Exclusion Criteria:

  • smokers and individuals who have prescribed medications over the past 6 months that could interfere with the study outcomes (i.e. statins, metformin). Breakfast skippers, those on a restricted energy diet or pregnant/lactating women

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00741923


Locations
Canada, Ontario
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3E2
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Toronto
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Harvey Anderson, Ph.D. University of Toronto

Responsible Party: G. Harvey Anderson, Professor, University of Toronto
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00741923     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: OMAF-HEINZbeans
BOW-2008
First Posted: August 26, 2008    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 15, 2012
Last Verified: June 2012

Keywords provided by G. Harvey Anderson, University of Toronto:
beans
pulses
satiety
appetite
obesity
overweight
diabetes
metabolic syndrome
hypertension
blood glucose
insulin
cholesterol
HDL
LDL
leptin
GLP-1
adiponectin
Peptide YY
diet

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hypertension
Overweight
Metabolic Syndrome X
Body Weight
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Insulin Resistance
Hyperinsulinism
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases