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Evaluation of Eye Movement Tracking Systems for Visual Rehabilitation

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00013429
First Posted: March 16, 2001
Last Update Posted: January 21, 2009
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
VA Office of Research and Development
  Purpose
The project objective is to validate the types of eye trackers that may most effectively be employed in the rehabilitation evaluation and training of people with central scotomas. The eye trackers will include the three basic types of eye trackers, namely, 1)electrophysical, 2) front surface trackers, and 3) retinal trackers.

Condition Intervention Phase
Blindness Procedure: Visual Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Evaluation of Eye Movement Tracking Systems for Visual Rehabilitation

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by VA Office of Research and Development:

Estimated Enrollment: 100
Study Start Date: January 2000
Study Completion Date: September 2003
Detailed Description:

The project objective is to validate the types of eye trackers that may most effectively be employed in the rehabilitation evaluation and training of people with central scotomas. The eye trackers will include equipment representing the three basic types of eye trackers, namely, 1) electrophysical (e.g., electrooculogram or EOG), 2) front surface trackers (e.g. pupil), and 3) retinal trackers (e.g. SLO). The most appropriate eye tracking system for evaluation and training will depend on the type of eye movements (i.e., fixations, saccades, and pursuits) that comprise the complex eye movements used for visual skills (e.g., spotting, localization, scanning, tracing, tracking) which are being evaluated/trained for visually guided activities of daily living (e.g., reading, face recognition and television watching).

The following methods will be employed. First, a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) will be employed to confirm that people with central scotomas are recruited from the Atlanta VA Eye Clinic and the VA Rehab R&D Subject Registry. SLO data taken for each eye will determine scotoma density, size and position. Visual functions of acuity, contrast sensitivity, and visual fields will be measured. Basic eye movements (e.g., fixation, tracking, saccades) and complex eye movements during visual tasks will be investigated to determine the effect of different biocular scotoma/PRL characteristics including: 1) central scotoma in one eye and functioning fovea in fellow eye, 2) central scotoma in both eyes and PRLs in retinal correspondence, and 3) central scotomas in both eyes with PRLs in anomalous retinal correspondence. Based on these biocular eye movement results, specifications can be developed for determining which eye can be used to monitor eye movements during binocular visual tasks (e.g., reading, face recognition, and TV event watching) as well as the need for biocular eye tracking equipment in evaluating complex eye movements. Each person will be tested using each representative eye tracker. The results of each eye tracker (position, velocity, and acceleration) in measuring PRL movements during fixation, saccade, and pursuit will be related to SLO measures. The results of these tests will also be compared to the types of measurements needed for evaluating complex eye movements in visual tasks. Specific measurements will be used to evaluate a patient's ability to perform the basic visual skills employed in performing everyday vision-related activities. The cost effectiveness of employing each type of eye tracker will be determined by a number of factors, including equipment cost, maintenance costs, ease of calibration and ease of use with low vision patients (e.g., feasibility for use with low vision patients who use head turns or optical low vision devices to view stimuli), and long-term reliability. Feasibility studies employing an eye tracker for eye movement monitoring during evaluations or biofeedback during training will be done in a few clinical studies (perimetry, PRL ability, visual scanning for reading training, and visual scanning for faces training) to indicate the potential clinical practicality of employing eye trackers for rehabilitative evaluation and training.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
Visually impaired
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00013429


Locations
United States, Georgia
VAMC, Decatur
Decatur, Georgia, United States
Sponsors and Collaborators
VA Office of Research and Development
Investigators
OverallOfficial: John Fryer, Ph.D., Asst. Director Department of Veterans Affairs, Program Analysis and Review Section (PARS), Rehabilitation Research & Development Service
OverallOfficial: Nancy Rocheleau, Program Analyst Department of Veterans Affairs, Program Analysis and Review Section (PARS), Rehabilitation Research & Development Service
  More Information

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00013429     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: C2102R
First Submitted: March 14, 2001
First Posted: March 16, 2001
Last Update Posted: January 21, 2009
Last Verified: January 2001

Keywords provided by VA Office of Research and Development:
Vision, Opthalmology, blindness, aging

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Blindness
Vision Disorders
Sensation Disorders
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Eye Diseases
Signs and Symptoms