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Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in Children

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00000384
First received: November 2, 1999
Last updated: August 19, 2016
Last verified: November 2005
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare 3 treatments for children with OCD: medication (sertraline, SER) alone vs OCD-specific therapy (Cognitive Behavior Therapy, CBT) vs medication plus therapy. Some patients will receive an inactive placebo (PBO) instead of medication and/or Educational Support (ES, non-psychological treatment) instead of therapy.

One in 200 children suffer from OCD, but few receive appropriate treatment. Both CBT and medication seem to be effective, but their effectiveness, alone and in combination, has not been evaluated.

There are 2 phases to this trial. In Phase I the child will receive 1 of the following 6 treatments for 12 weeks: 1) SER alone; 2) pill PBO alone; 3) CBT alone; 4) SER plus CBT; 5) SER plus ES; 6) pill PBO plus ES. If the child responds to treatment, he/she will go on to Phase II in which the treatment will be slowly reduced, then stopped (discontinued), over time to test the treatment's durability. The child will be evaluated at Weeks 1, 4, 8, 12 (Phase I treatment), and Weeks 16, 20, 24, and 28 (Phase II discontinuation) to see how effective and durable the treatment is in treating your child's OCD.

A child may be eligible for this study if he/she:

Has obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and is 8 - 16 years old.


Condition Intervention Phase
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Behavioral: Cognitive Behavior Therapy Behavioral: Educational Support Drug: Sertraline Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Pennsylvania:

Study Start Date: May 1997
Estimated Study Completion Date: April 2002
Detailed Description:

To contrast the degree and durability of improvement in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), patients will be treated with 1 of 6 conditions (3 active treatments and 3 control treatments): sertraline alone (SER), OCD-specific Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), both SER and CBT (SER plus CBT), pill placebo (PBO), pill PBO plus Educational Support (ES), and SER plus ES.

One in 200 youth suffers from OCD, yet relatively few receive appropriate treatment. Both CBT and medication appear beneficial in controlled studies; however, the relative efficacy of CBT and medication, alone and in combination (COMB) is unknown. Thus, well-designed treatment outcome studies are necessary to improve care for youth with OCD.

The experimental design covers 2 phases. Phase I is a 2 (site) x 2 (SER or pill PBO) x 3 (CBT, ES or non- psychosocial treatment) x 5 (repeated measures) factorial 12-week comparison of SER, CBT, COMB and the control conditions. In Phase II, responders advance to a 16-week discontinuation study to assess treatment durability. The primary outcome measure is the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. Assessments blind to treatment status take place at Week 0 (pretreatment); Weeks 1, 4, 8, 12 (Phase I treatment); and Weeks 16, 20, 24 and 28 (Phase II discontinuation). Besides addressing comparative efficacy and durability of the specified treatments, the investigators also examine time-action effects, differential effects on specific aspects of OCD, including functional impairment, and predictors of response to treatment.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years to 16 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Patients must have:

DSM-IV diagnosed OCD.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00000384

Locations
United States, North Carolina
Duke Univ. Med. Ctr.
Durham, North Carolina, United States, 27710
United States, Pennsylvania
Univ of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pennsylvania
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Edna B. Foa, PhD
Principal Investigator: John S. March, MD, MPH
  More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000384     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R01MH055126 ( US NIH Grant/Contract Award Number )
R10MH055121 ( US NIH Grant/Contract Award Number )
DSIR 84-CTM
Study First Received: November 2, 1999
Last Updated: August 19, 2016

Keywords provided by University of Pennsylvania:
Adolescence
Child
Cognitive Therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Placebos
Sertraline
Patient Education
Psychotherapy

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Disease
Compulsive Personality Disorder
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Compulsive Behavior
Pathologic Processes
Personality Disorders
Mental Disorders
Anxiety Disorders
Impulsive Behavior
Sertraline
Antidepressive Agents
Psychotropic Drugs
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Neurotransmitter Uptake Inhibitors
Membrane Transport Modulators
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Neurotransmitter Agents
Serotonin Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on June 22, 2017