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Thalamic Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Brain Injury (LIFUP)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02522429
Recruitment Status : Terminated (COVID-19 restrictions placed on the study.)
First Posted : August 13, 2015
Results First Posted : December 28, 2022
Last Update Posted : December 28, 2022
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
The Dana Foundation
Tiny Blue Dot Foundation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Martin M Monti, University of California, Los Angeles

Brief Summary:
Few neurological conditions are as scientifically mysterious and clinically, legally, and ethically challenging as disorders of consciousness. To date there exists no standard intervention for patients suffering from these devastating conditions. The present project is aimed at evaluating the potential of non-invasive Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation (LIFUP) of thalamus (a key area for the consciousness network) as a neurorestorative stimulation for those patients. In this study, LIFUP will be performed during two sessions. The proposed experiment will involve behavioral and paramedical measurements just before and after each of the two LIFUP sessions in a small sample of patients (up to 15 acute and 15 chronic patients) in order to evaluate the feasibility of a full scale clinical trial.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Consciousness Disorders Brain Injuries Device: Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Device Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Few neurological conditions are as scientifically mysterious and clinically, legally, and ethically challenging as disorders of consciousness (DOC). Typically developed after severe brain injury, this set of related conditions includes Coma, the Vegetative State (VS) and the Minimally Conscious State (MCS). In the past 20 years, an increasing amount of research has broken many conventions about these disorders, including the once widespread belief that these patients are entirely apallic - that is, lack any kind of "higher" activity. Since then, it has been shown that a lot of brain activity, including relatively high-level cognitive processes, can remain in DOC patients. Nonetheless, to date there exists no standard intervention for patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Developing interventions for this population is extremely important first and foremost for the well-being of patients, who - today - remain completely dependent on assisted care, are often unable to participate in rehabilitative programs because of their lack of behavioral responsiveness, and thus find themselves prisoners of a condition characterized by uncertainty at the medical, legal and ethical decision-making levels. In addition, these conditions, which can last indefinitely, also place great emotional and monetary strain on families, large burdens on care-takers - often leading to increased rates of burn-out - and large financial stress on medical structures and public finances due to the large costs imposed by prolonged intensive care.

The present project is aimed at evaluating the potential of non-invasive Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation (LIFUP) of thalamus (a key area for the consciousness network) as a neurorestorative stimulation for patients with severe brain injury.

LIFUP will be performed during two sessions (one occurring after deep sedation is stopped and the second one occurring just before discharge). The proposed experiment will involve behavioral (i.e., CRS-R) and paramedical (i.e., MRI/fMRI) measurements just before and after each of the two LIFUP sessions (i.e., 5 non-consecutive minutes of stimulation in each session) in a small sample of patients (up to 15 acute and 15 chronic DOC patients) in order to evaluate the feasibility of a full scale clinical trial.

The duration of participation in the study will be a year. In terms of impact, we think this project would have a number of immediate consequences. (i) A successful pilot study and any indication that this approach might have the hypothesized effect would place us in a unique position to initiate a fully-fledged double-blind clinical trial in a large cohort of patients.

(ii) From a purely scientific point of view, by virtue of testing what is today the most prominent physiological hypothesis concerning loss and recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury, this project has a direct repercussion on our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these conditions. (iii) From a clinical and patient management point of view the present project is the first necessary step towards opening a completely new avenue for care-taking in patients suffering from this devastating condition for which there is no intervention. In particular, if this project were successful in the long run (e.g., after a double-blind full clinical trial), it could make widely available a non-invasive protocol which could substitute the currently highly invasive (and therefore not widely available, and high risk) only intervention available.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 23 participants
Allocation: N/A
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Intervention Model Description: 15 acute DOC patients and 15 chronic DOC patients.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Thalamic Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Stimulation in Disorders of Consciousness Following Severe Brain Injury
Actual Study Start Date : March 10, 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 3, 2020
Actual Study Completion Date : November 3, 2020

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Device
15 acute DOC patients, 15 chronic DOC patients
Device: Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Device
Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation (LIFUP) of thalamus (a key area for the consciousness network) will be performed during two sessions (one occurring after deep sedation is stopped and the second one occurring just before discharge). The proposed experiment will involve behavioral (i.e., CRS-R) and paramedical (i.e., MRI/fMRI and EEG) measurements just before and after each of the two LIFUP sessions (i.e., 5 non-consecutive minutes of stimulation in each session).
Other Names:
  • BX Pulsar 1001
  • BX Pulsar 1002




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of Voxels in Which the Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Signal is Significantly Associated to LIFUP Across the Whole Group (Session 1) [ Time Frame: day 3 (+/-2) ]
    Number of voxels found to have a functional MRI signal (measured with a Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent sequence) significantly associated with the onset/offset of the LIFUP stimulation across the tested population.

  2. Number of Voxels in Which the Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Signal is Significantly Associated to LIFUP (Session 2) [ Time Frame: day 10 (+/-2) ]
    Number of voxels found to have a functional MRI signal (measured with a Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent sequence) significantly associated with the onset/offset of the LIFUP stimulation.

  3. Number of Participants With (Severe) Adverse Events [ Time Frame: day 16 (+/-3) ]
    Number of AEs and SAEs occurring throughout the paradigm.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) [ Time Frame: Change in maximum CRS-R score in the 3 measurements following LIFUP (day of, day after, 1 week after) compared to the maximum CRS-R score in the 3 measurements prior to LIFUP (1 week before, day before, day of). ]
    The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is a standard clinical protocol specifically developed to assess a patient's level of consciousness, and does so by evaluating a patient's level of responsiveness to sensory stimulation, their ability to understand language, and to communicate. This procedure is typically administered at bedside. The protocol is divided into 6 sub-scales, each assessing a different area (e.g., visual function, auditory function, communication, arousal), and the final score is calculating by adding all sub-scales.The total score of this scale goes from its minimum, 0, which implied a state of coma, to 23, which implies emergence from a Minimally Conscious State (i.e., eMCS). Higher values thus map onto better outcomes.

  2. Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E) [ Time Frame: day 16 (+/-3) and day 180 (+/-15) ]
    The Glasgow Outcome Scale extended (GOS-E) is a global scale that classifies functional outcome in brain injury patients. Specifically, the scale, which ranges from a minimum total score of 1 (i.e., Dead) to a maximum total score of 8 (Upper Good Recovery), classifies patient status into one of eight categories: Dead (score: 1), Vegetative State (score: 2), Lower Severe Disability (score: 3), Upper Severe Disability (score: 4), Lower Moderate Disability (score: 5), Upper Moderate Disability (score: 6), Lower Good Recovery (score: 7), or Upper Good Recovery (score: 8). Higher scores thus represent better outcomes. The score is determined according to specific answers given in the instrument.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Acute patients

  • < 6 weeks since injury
  • a Glasgow Coma Score < 9 (at the time of injury)
  • an abnormal CT
  • prolonged loss of consciousness (>24h)
  • behavioral profile consistent with a VS or MCS as assessed with the Coma Recovery Scale Revised.

Chronic patients:

  • > 3 months post injury for non-traumatic injuries, >12 months post-injury for traumatic injuries
  • behavioral profile consistent with a VS or MCS as assessed with the Coma Recovery Scale Revised.

Exclusion Criteria (all patients):

  • deep sedation
  • history of neurological illness prior to injury
  • inability to safely enter the MR environment (e.g., ferromagnetic non MR safe implants)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02522429


Locations
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United States, California
University of California, Los Angeles
Los Angeles, California, United States, 90095-1563
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of California, Los Angeles
The Dana Foundation
Tiny Blue Dot Foundation
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Martin M Monti, Prof University of California, Los Angeles
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Martin M Monti, University of California, Los Angeles:
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Responsible Party: Martin M Monti, Assistant Professor, University of California, Los Angeles
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02522429    
Other Study ID Numbers: 441488-MM-58041
First Posted: August 13, 2015    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: December 28, 2022
Last Update Posted: December 28, 2022
Last Verified: November 2022
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Brain Injuries
Consciousness Disorders
Wounds and Injuries
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Craniocerebral Trauma
Trauma, Nervous System
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Neurocognitive Disorders
Mental Disorders