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Effect of Changing Sedentary Behavior in Youth (Effects)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00962247
First Posted: August 19, 2009
Last Update Posted: August 24, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Leonard Epstein, State University of New York at Buffalo
  Purpose
The primary aim is to examine how reduction in sedentary behaviors influences physical activity and energy intake.

Condition Intervention
Obesity Device: Television reduction device

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Sequential Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Effect of Changing Sedentary Behavior in Youth

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Leonard Epstein, State University of New York at Buffalo:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Physical Activity [ Time Frame: 3 days ]
    Actigraph activity monitors were used to record physical activity over 3 days, in addition to a weekly physical activity diary. Acti-graph counts were used to estimate energy expenditure during waking hours. Counts per minute describes the average rate of counts, with 0 being at rest and higher numbers indicating more vigorous physical activity.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Energy Intake [ Time Frame: 3 days ]
    Resting metabolic rate was calculated using the activity data from accelerometer (Actigraph) collection. Resting metabolic rate was used to calculate estimated daily energy expenditure. Daily energy expenditure and weight change over the study period was used to estimate energy intake. If weight was stable of the nine weeks, assume energy intake = energy expenditure. A gain of a pound was estimated as equivalent to a positive balance of 3500 calories and a loss of a pound was estimated as equivalent to a negative balance of 3500 calories.


Enrollment: 61
Study Start Date: July 2006
Study Completion Date: December 2008
Primary Completion Date: December 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Sedentary; usual, 25% reduced, 50% reduced
The initial 3 weeks of the study, children were asked to maintain their usual targeted sedentary behaviors (TV, video game, computer use) measured by a television reduction device (TV Allowance). The following 3 weeks children were asked to reduce their targeted sedentary behaviors (TV, video game, computer use) by 25% from the usual sedentary condition using a television reduction device (TV Allowance). The final 3 weeks of the study, children were asked to reduce their targeted sedentary behaviors (TV, video game, computer use) by 50% from the usual sedentary condition using a television reduction device (TV Allowance)
Device: Television reduction device
A TV allowance helps turn off the television when the time limits have been met.

Detailed Description:
Many youth find television, videos and computer games to be very reinforcing, and they choose to be sedentary rather than physically active. Sedentary behaviors can influence energy balance and body weight by reducing physical activity and increasing energy intake. Research from our laboratory has shown that reducing sedentary behavior can increase physical activity and decrease energy intake, but there is substantial variability in the response of youth to reductions in sedentary behavior. The present proposal is designed to extend our research and explore theoretical models that may help understand why youth vary in their response to increase physical activity when targeted sedentary behaviors are reduced. We hypothesize that the increase in physical activity when sedentary behaviors are reduced is related to the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of physical activity to sedentary behaviors. The RRV of physical activity is a measure of the motivation to be active in youth, and overweight youth who are inactive find physical activity relatively less reinforcing than less overweight youth. We predict that RRV of physical activity will be positively related to the substitution of total physical activity and physical activity in the moderate to vigorous intensity range for sedentary behaviors when targeted sedentary behaviors are reduced. To test this hypothesis, we will study 60 overweight and at risk for overweight 8-12 year-old youth who differ in the RRV of physical activity to sedentary behavior, with equal numbers of boys and girls, in 3 phases: baseline, and reduce television watching from baseline by 25 percent and 50 percent. Each phase will be implemented for three weeks. Order of experimental phases will be counterbalanced across subjects. It is also predicted that reducing sedentary behavior will reduce energy intake and dietary fat intake, and the reduction in energy intake will be greatest for youth with stronger association between eating with television watching and other targeted sedentary behaviors. Liking and outcome expectancy of physical activity will be studied as additional predictors of substitution of physical activity for reductions in sedentary behaviors. Developing a better understanding of why obese youth increase physical activity or decrease energy intake when sedentary behaviors are reduced is important for the treatment of pediatric obesity.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years to 12 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • above the 85th BMI percentile
  • reside in one primary household
  • engage in at least 18 hours of sedentary behavior a week

Exclusion Criteria:

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00962247


Locations
United States, New York
University at Buffalo
Buffalo, New York, United States, 14214
Sponsors and Collaborators
State University of New York at Buffalo
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
  More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Leonard Epstein, Leonard H. Epstein, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00962247     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HD039778
5R01HD039778 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: August 17, 2009
First Posted: August 19, 2009
Results First Submitted: November 11, 2016
Results First Posted: August 24, 2017
Last Update Posted: August 24, 2017
Last Verified: July 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Keywords provided by Leonard Epstein, State University of New York at Buffalo:
physical activity
relative reinforcing value
sedentary behavior
obesity