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Green Tea Consumption and Coronary Heart Disease

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005548
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: May 13, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  Purpose
To examine the prospective association of green tea consumption to the incidence and mortality of coronary heart disease (CHD) using multivariate analysis while controlling for the potential confounding effects of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose and dietary nutrients.

Condition
Cardiovascular Diseases Coronary Disease Heart Diseases

Study Type: Observational

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI):

Study Start Date: April 1999
Study Completion Date: March 2001
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

Both in vivo and in vitro experiments have show that flavonoids, antioxidants which are rich in green tea, are potentially as beneficial as vitamin E, beta-carotene and vitamin C in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Thus, the possible preventive effects of green tea on CHD have begun to raise research interests in green tea sufficiently to inquire about its beneficial effects formally in humans. However, few epidemiologic studies have been carried out to directly examine the effects of green tea on CHD. The Honolulu Heart Program (HHP) is a 30 year longitudinal study of CHD and stroke among 8,006 Japanese American men living on Oahu Hawaii. Until the end of 1992, 1,888 men from this cohort were defined as having incident CHD; this includes 396 deaths due to CHD. The baseline examination for the HHP was conducted during 1965-68. A comprehensive physical examination and 24 hour dietary recall interview were administered. Within the original cohort more than 75 percent men reported to have drunk green tea daily. The amount consumed per day varied considerably from low to high doses. The high prevalence of green tea consumption coupled with dose information (i.e low, moderate and high consumption) provides good opportunities to examine the relationships of green tea consumption and CHD.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study uses the Honolulu Heart Program data to examine the prospective association of green tea consumption to the incidence and mortality of CHD using multivariate analysis while controlling for the potential confounding effects of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose and dietary nutrients.

The study completion date listed in this record was obtained from the "End Date" entered in the Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS) record.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
No eligibility criteria
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00005548


Sponsors and Collaborators
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Investigators
OverallOfficial: Boji Huang University of Toledo
  More Information

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005548     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 5092
R03HL062577 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: May 25, 2000
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: May 13, 2016
Last Verified: January 2005

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Coronary Disease
Coronary Artery Disease
Myocardial Ischemia
Vascular Diseases
Arteriosclerosis
Arterial Occlusive Diseases