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Buprenorphine Maintenance vs. Detoxification in Prescription Opioid Dependence

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
David Fiellin, Yale University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00555425
First received: November 6, 2007
Last updated: January 23, 2017
Last verified: January 2017
  Purpose
The aim of the study is to determine whether buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance versus detoxification using buprenorphine/naloxone, in prescription opioid dependent patients receiving primary care management and drug counseling in an office-based setting, leads to decreased illicit opioid use.

Condition Intervention Phase
Opiate Dependence Behavioral: Behavioral: Buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance (Mtn) Behavioral: Behavioral: Buprenorphine/naloxone detoxification (Dtx) Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Buprenorphine Maintenance vs. Detoxification in Prescription Opioid Dependence

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by David Fiellin, Yale University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Illicit Opioid Use [ Time Frame: 18 weeks ]
    Urinalysis based on scheduled weekly urine screenings during treatment period


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Proportion of Patients Protectively Transferred [ Time Frame: 18 weeks ]
    >= 2 consecutive weeks of daily illicit opioid use and opioid positive urine samples after completion of the first 6 weeks of the study

  • Retention in Treatment [ Time Frame: 18 weeks ]
    Mean number of days from randomization to last clinical contact

  • Reduction in Cocaine Use [ Time Frame: 18 weeks ]
    As measured by the percent of provided urines positive for cocaine

  • Changes in HIV Risk [ Time Frame: Baseline and 18 weeks ]

    As measured by the AIDS Risk Inventory. The AIDS Risk Inventory (ARI) is a 166 item structured interview that assesses the number and frequency of drug-related and sexual risk behaviors in the preceding 3 months. Calculation of the ARI total score is based on the frequency of occurrence of a given behavior and on the recency of this behavior, with recency being weighted more than a life-time occurrence of the same behavior. Higher values are associated with greater risk of HIV transmission (worse).

    There are 10 subscales comprised of between 8 and 24 items. Subscales scores are based on the sum of the individual items and the overall ARI total score is the sum of the subscales.

    Scores can range from 0 to 350, although among opioid dependent patients most values are below 100 with means between 50 and 60 depending on characteristics of the patients and treatment status.


  • Patient Satisfaction [ Time Frame: 18 weeks ]
    Patient satisfaction as measured by survey. Primary Care Buprenorphine Satisfaction Scale (PCBSS). Comprises of 19 items evaluating satisfaction with staff expertise, concern, and responsiveness. Range of scores from 15-95. I higher score indicates greater satisfaction.

  • Health Status [ Time Frame: 18 weeks ]
    Measured by the SF-36 overall transformed measure. In the SF-36 all items are scored so that a high score defines a more favorable health state. In addition, each item is scored on a 0 to 100 range so that the lowest and highest possible scores are 0 and 100, respectively.


Enrollment: 113
Study Start Date: July 2008
Study Completion Date: May 2013
Primary Completion Date: May 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: 1
Buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance (Mtn) is designed to reflect usual care by primary care physicians and includes weekly drug counseling (DC) and referral to ancillary services.
Behavioral: Behavioral: Buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance (Mtn)
Mtn is designed to reflect usual care by primary care physicians and includes weekly drug counseling (DC) and referral to ancillary services. Dtx and Mtn will be identical for the first 4 weeks (stabilization) following randomization. In Mtn, Bup will continue unchanged for the remainder of the study.
Experimental: 2
Buprenorphine/naloxone detoxification (Dtx) is identical to Mtn for the first 4 weeks (stabilization) following randomization. In Mtn, Bup will continue unchanged for the remainder of the study. In Dtx, the dosage of Bup will be tapered to zero over the next 3 weeks, and patients will not receive additional Bup for the remainder of the study. Dtx patients will be offered thrice-weekly DC beginning during the taper and naltrexone will be offered 7 days following the last dose of Buprenorphine/naloxone.
Behavioral: Behavioral: Buprenorphine/naloxone detoxification (Dtx)
Dtx and Mtn will be identical for the first 4 weeks (stabilization) following randomization. In Dtx, the dosage of Bup will be tapered to zero over the next 3 weeks, and patients will not receive additional Bup for the remainder of the study. Dtx patients will be offered thrice-weekly DC beginning during the taper and naltrexone will be offered 7 days following the last dose of Bup.

Detailed Description:
Prescription opioid dependence is increasing and creates a significant public health burden, but office-based physicians lack evidence-based guidelines to decide between maintenance or detoxification treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone. The proposed study compares buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance (Mtn) vs. detoxification (Dtx) in a 18-week randomized clinical trail in a heterogeneous population of prescription opioid dependent patients (N=120) in a primary care clinic. Patients are randomized to Mtn or Dtx after a 2-week induction period. Mtn is designed to reflect usual care by primary care physicians and includes weekly drug counseling (DC) and referral to ancillary services. Dtx and Mtn will be identical for the first 4 weeks (stabilization) following randomization. In Mtn, buprenorphine/naloxone will continue unchanged for the remainder of the study. In Dtx, the dosage of buprenorphine/naloxone will be tapered to zero over the next 3 weeks, and patients will not receive additional buprenorphine/naloxone for the remainder of the study. Dtx patients will be offered thrice-weekly DC beginning during the taper and naltrexone will be offered 7 days following the last dose of Bup. The study will test the hypothesis that Mtn will lead to decreased illicit drug use and will demonstrate incremental cost-effectiveness compared to Dtx. Relevance to public health: The results of this study will help define the role of maintenance vs. detoxification with buprenorphine/naloxone in the care of prescription opioid dependent patients in primary care.
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • opioid dependence

Exclusion Criteria:

  • current dependence on alcohol, cocaine, benzodiazepines or sedatives
  • current suicide or homicide risk
  • current psychotic disorder or untreated major depression
  • inability to read or understand English
  • life-threatening or unstable medical problems
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00555425

Locations
United States, Connecticut
The APT Foundation, Inc. -- Welch Building
New Haven, Connecticut, United States, 06519
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, Connecticut, United States, 06520
Sponsors and Collaborators
Yale University
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: David A. Fiellin, MD Yale University
  More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: David Fiellin, Professor of Medicine, Yale University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00555425     History of Changes
Obsolete Identifiers: NCT00595400
Other Study ID Numbers: 1R01DA020576-01A1 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
R01DA020576 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
DPMC ( Other Identifier: NIDA )
Study First Received: November 6, 2007
Results First Received: January 25, 2016
Last Updated: January 23, 2017

Keywords provided by David Fiellin, Yale University:
Buprenorphine
Buprenorphine/naloxone
Counseling
Primary care

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Opioid-Related Disorders
Substance-Related Disorders
Chemically-Induced Disorders
Mental Disorders
Buprenorphine
Buprenorphine, Naloxone Drug Combination
Naloxone
Analgesics, Opioid
Narcotics
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Analgesics
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Narcotic Antagonists

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2017