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Dermoscopy of Hypo-pigmented Lesions in Children

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04089475
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : September 13, 2019
Last Update Posted : September 13, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
SNIsrael, Assiut University

Brief Summary:

Hypo-pigmented skin lesions in children are of great concern in the society. They cause anxiety among children and their parents due to the social stigma attached to these conditions especially in dark skinned children. Hypo pigmented skin lesions are commonly encountered in day-to-day practice, and they pose a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. They are one of the commonest complains in the dermatology clinics and generally share the same patient complaint which is characterized by the presence of hypo or depigmented patches or macules .

Dermoscopy may be a helpful as a non-invasive tool in assisting the differential diagnosis of several hypopigmented macular lesions and has the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Hypopigmented Skin Device: Dermoscope

Detailed Description:

Among the most common disorders of hypo-pigmentation in children are pityriasis alba, vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, postinflammatory hypopigmentation and tinea versicolor ; while idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis and hypopigmented mycosis fungoides comes late.

Pityriasis alba : is a low-grade type of eczema/dermatitis mostly occurring in children and young adults , usually seen as dry, fine-scaled, pale patches on the face .

Vitiligo : is an acquired, autoimmune, idiopathic disorder characterized by circumscribed depigmented macules and patches with or without leukotrichia .

Nevus depigmentosus : is a localized hypopigmentation which most of the time is congenital. It is considered as a form of cutaneous mosaicism.

Postinflammatory hypopigmentation : is an acquired partial or total loss of skin pigmentation occurring after cutaneous inflammation. Many cutaneous inflammatory conditions lead to postinflammatory hypopigmentation in children as :Atopic dermatitis , Insect bite reactions, Psoriasis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome ….; Infections as Chickenpox, Impetigo …..; Cutaneous injuries from burns, irritants .All tend to induce postinflammatory hypopigmentation rather than hyperpigmentation .

Pityriasis versicolor or tinea versicolor : is a fungal infection of the superficial layer of skin caused by Malassezia yeasts. It is clinically characterized by hyperpigmented or hypopigmented, round to oval lesions covered with scales commonly found on the trunk, upper arms and face. Although it's common in adults but it can be seen in older group of children .

Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis : is an acquired leukoderma found in all races; Its pathogenesis is unknown but may depend on various factors such as patient age and sun-exposure. Clinically, the lesions are porcelain-white macules, usually 2-6 mm in size, but sometimes they are larger. The borders are sharply defined, often angular and irregular with normal skin markings.

Mycosis fungoides, the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: is a neoplastic disease characterized by classical non-infiltrated lesions (patches), plaques, tumors, and erythrodermic stages .It is considered a serious condition that has been seen before in children. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is one of its variants that is presented by hypopigmented-to-achromic lesions, sometimes with a vitiligo-like aspect.

In addition to clinical picture, Woods light examination and potassium hydroxide scrapping for scaly hypopigmented macules and histopathological evaluation are used to be the gold standard tests for diagnosis of those hypopigmented lesions in children.

Dermoscopy is a noninvasive diagnostic tool that permits the visualization of morphological features that are not visible to the naked eye thus representing a link between macroscopic clinical dermatology and microscopic dermatopathology . Recently, awareness and knowledge of dermoscopy have increased tremendously in many countries in diagnosis of many skin conditions .

Dermoscopy may be a helpful as a non-invasive tool in assisting the differential diagnosis of several hypopigmented macular lesions and has the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy. New studies have documented dermoscopic features in vitiligo , While very few reports have documented the dermoscopic features of the other hypopigmented lesions.


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Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 150 participants
Observational Model: Other
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Hypo-pigmented Skin Lesions in Children : Dermoscopic Evaluation
Estimated Study Start Date : November 1, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : November 1, 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 1, 2020

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine



Intervention Details:
  • Device: Dermoscope
    Dermoscopy is a noninvasive diagnostic tool that permits the visualization of morphological features that are not visible to the naked eye thus representing a link between macroscopic clinical dermatology and microscopic dermatopathology.


Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. To detect the sensitivity and specificity of the dermoscope in diagnosis of hypopigmented skin lesions in children [ Time Frame: Almost 6 months after we start ]
    correlate the diagnosis of the hypopigmented lesions with the dermoscopic features and test the validity of the dermoscope in diagnosis .



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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
All children up to (18) years old attending Assiut University Hospital complaining of hypopigmented skin lesions.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All children up to (18) years old attending Assiut University Hospital complaining of hypopigmented skin lesions.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients on topical or systemic treatment ( in the last 1 and 3 months , respectively) will be excluded.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04089475


Contacts
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Contact: Hatem Zidan, MDT 00201003420217 hzma03@yahoo.com
Contact: Radwa Bakr, MDT 00201119988115 radwabakr2011@hotmail.com

Sponsors and Collaborators
Assiut University

Publications:

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Responsible Party: SNIsrael, principal investigator, Assiut University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04089475     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: DHLC
First Posted: September 13, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 13, 2019
Last Verified: September 2019

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Hypopigmentation
Pigmentation Disorders
Skin Diseases