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Use of Social Media to Improve Medication Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults With Systemic Lupus

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03218033
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 14, 2017
Last Update Posted : July 14, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Children's Miracle Network
Lupus Foundation of America
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Lisabeth Scalzi, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

Brief Summary:
The goal of this study was to examine the effect of an online educational program with and without a social media experience.The primary goal of this study was to determine whether medication adherence would be improved by having adolescents and young adults with systemic lupus erythematosus participate in an online educational website, with or without a social media experience. The secondary goal was to determine whether secondary outcomes such as quality of life, stress, and self-efficacy improved in this model, and whether these changes were associated with improvements in medication management.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Systemic Lupus Behavioral: Social Media Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Self-management skills, including medication management, are vital to the health of adolescents and young adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Non-adherence with medications in patients with systemic lupus has been noted to be as poor as 40%. Success in disease control can be significantly impacted by such non-adherence. Poor medication compliance is associated with higher SLE disease activity scores and higher SLE disease activity in turn has been demonstrated to be significantly associated with a decline in quality of life. Much attention has been paid to how to improve self-management skills in adults, but less is known about how to target adolescents, an age group with a complex set of emotional and developmental needs.

The goal of this study was to examine the effect of an online educational program with and without a social media experience.The primary goal of this study was to determine whether medication adherence would be improved by having adolescents and young adults with SLE participate in an online educational website, with or without a social media experience. The secondary goal was to determine whether secondary outcomes such as quality of life, stress, and self-efficacy improved in this model, and whether these changes were associated with improvements in medication management.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 37 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Improvement of Medication Adherence in Adolescents With SLE Using Web-based Education With and Without a Social Media Intervention
Actual Study Start Date : May 1, 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : January 31, 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : January 31, 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Lupus

Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: Control
Participants visited the Facinglupustogether.com website and participated in consecutive weekly modules for 8 weeks. At the end of each module there were questions pertaining to the subject of each module. The control group answered the questions in provided journals and these were sent back to the investigator. All subjects completed surveys in REDCap prior to the study intervention and again 6 weeks after study completion to assess secondary outcome measures. Medication adherence was assessed by calculating a medication possession ratio by acquiring information on fill dates at the subjects' pharmacies.
Active Comparator: Social Media (SM)

The intervention phase was 8 weeks in duration. Participants visited the Facinglupustogether.com website and participated in consecutive weekly modules. 8 The SM group answered the questions at the end of each module on a blogging site with other SM participants. SM participants were encouraged to provide feedback or questions about the material or personal questions that arose in response to each module.

All subjects completed surveys in REDCap prior to the study intervention and again 6 weeks after study completion to assess secondary outcome measures. Medication adherence was assessed by calculating a medication possession ratio by acquiring information on fill dates at the subjects' pharmacies.

Behavioral: Social Media



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Medication Adherence [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    A medication possession ratio was calculated based on fill date information from the subjects' pharmacies


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Stress utilizing the Perceived Severity of Stress Questionnaire [ Time Frame: 14 weeks ]
    Stress was measured by the Perceived Severity of Stress Questionnaire (PSQ)

  2. Self-efficacy utilizing the Children's Arthritis Self-Efficacy scale [ Time Frame: 14 weeks ]
    Self-efficacy was measured using the Children's Arthritis Self-Efficacy scale (CASE) which was modified slightly for systemic lupus

  3. Quality of Life utilizing the Simple Measure of the Impact of Lupus Erythematosus in Youngsters (SMILEY) index [ Time Frame: 14 weeks ]
    Quality of life was assessed using the validated Simple Measure of the Impact of Lupus Erythematosus in Youngsters (SMILEY) index

  4. Sense of agency [ Time Frame: 14 weeks ]
    Sense of agency (SOA) was measured via three Likert scale questions aimed to tap three core concepts of agency: competence ("Blogging… makes me feel I have control over my own voice"), assertiveness ("…enables me to assert myself"), and confidence ("…makes me feel I have a distinct voice")

  5. Sense of community [ Time Frame: 14 weeks ]
    Sense of community (SOC) was measured using a 22-item scale (8, 9, 20). SOC consists of feelings of belonging to the community, having influence on, and being influenced by, the community, being supported by the community while also supporting them; and feelings of shared emotional connection.

  6. Empowerment [ Time Frame: 14 weeks ]
    Empowerment was assessed using a validated quantitative Likert scale tool that measured 1) "empowering processes" (Appendix A), and 2) "empowering outcomes"



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   13 Years to 23 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • age between 13 and 23 at the time of recruitment
  • having the diagnosis of SLE made or confirmed by a pediatric or adult rheumatologist at Penn State Children's Hospital/Hershey Medical Center
  • having regular internet access.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • age <13 or >23 years
  • comorbid medical or psychiatric illness that would affect the outcome measures.

Additional Information:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Lisabeth Scalzi, Principal Investigator, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03218033     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 038689EP
First Posted: July 14, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 14, 2017
Last Verified: July 2017

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Lisabeth Scalzi, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center:
systemic lupus
self-management
social media

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic
Connective Tissue Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases