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Promoting Sport Participation During Early Parenthood

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02898285
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : September 13, 2016
Last Update Posted : May 3, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ryan Rhodes, University of Victoria

Brief Summary:

The primary objective of this investigation is to test the efficacy of two sport participation formats (individual sport, team sport) on key psychosocial outcomes compared to a non-sport condition among parents of young children who were not participating in sport at baseline of the study.

Research of this type is important because parents represent a group dealing with numerous challenges and this is a period of time shown to have the greatest decline in physical activity. Furthermore, parents could reap great benefits in psychological health through the increase in physical activity and sport participation.

It is hypothesized that participation will be predicted by sports commitment as per the tenets of the Sport Commitment Model, and commitment will be predicted primarily by enjoyment (+), social constraints from family obligations/involvement alternatives (-), followed by social involvement opportunities/personal investments (+).


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Parents Well-being Behavioral: Team sports Behavioral: Individual sport condition Behavioral: Night out Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

This study is exploring the impact team sports has on psychological well-being of parents compared to individual sports or a "night out". Our research questions include:

Does 1) team sports participation (choice-based from existing adult recreation leagues in greater Victoria) increase psychosocial outcomes (quality of life, relationship satisfaction, social functioning, perceived parenting capability, enjoyment) compared with 2) individual sport participation (choice-based from adult recreation alternatives in greater Victoria), and 3) a standard control condition? Hypothesis: The team sports condition will show significantly larger changes in psychosocial outcomes compared to the two other conditions after three-months of participation (primary end-point). Furthermore, the individual sports condition will show significantly larger changes in psychosocial outcomes compared to the control condition after three-months of participation.

Secondary Research Questions

  1. Can participation in the team sports and individual sports conditions be explained by the constructs of the Sport Commitment model [21]? Hypothesis: Participation will be predicted by sports commitment as per the tenets of the Sport Commitment Model, and commitment will be predicted primarily by enjoyment (+), social constraints from family obligations/involvement alternatives (-), followed by social involvement opportunities/personal investments (+).
  2. Can group differences among parents with regard to these participation and psychosocial outcomes be explained through a mediation model? Hypothesis: The covariance of the assigned conditions on psychosocial outcomes will be explained by sport participation. In turn, the covariance between participation and assigned conditions will be explained by salient underlying motives from the Sport Commitment Model. In particular, enjoyment will explain the differences between both sport conditions but the better psychosocial outcomes from team sports will be explained by the additional social involvement opportunities.
  3. Is there a seasonal, gender, dual/single parent, age of child, or type of sport difference across primary outcomes by assigned condition? Hypothesis: These are exploratory research questions with no pre-set hypothesis. Both sport conditions may have participation lowered by weather conditions in the winter. Men may participate in sport more due to lower child-rearing expectations but there is limited research to support this conjecture at this time.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 240 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Promoting Sport Participation During Early Parenthood
Study Start Date : August 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2021

Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Night out condition
People randomized to this group will be asked to go on a "night out" with no kids (i.e. dinner, or a movie) once a month.
Behavioral: Night out
Participants in this group will be asked to go out on a date such as dinner or a movie (only restrictions are they cannot go do a sport)

Experimental: Individual sport condition
People randomized to this group will select an individual sport from a list of 5. They will be asked to participate in this individual sport for three months.
Behavioral: Individual sport condition
Participants will choose from a list of 5 individual sports.

Experimental: Team sport condition
People randomized to this group will select a team sport from a list of 5. They will be asked to participate in the team sport for three months (length of the team sport season).
Behavioral: Team sports
Participants will choose from a list of 5 team sports and will be signed up with the team.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Parental Quality of Life [ Time Frame: Baseline, six weeks and three months ]
    Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale will be administered in the baseline questionnaire

  2. Change in Parenting competency [ Time Frame: Baseline, six weeks, and three months ]
    Parenting competency will be examined at baseline. Citation: Gibaud-Wallston, J., & Wandersman, L. P. (n.d.). Parenting Sense of Competence Scale. PsycTESTS Dataset.

  3. Change in Parenting Stress [ Time Frame: Baseline, six weeks and three months ]
    Berry, JD, & Jones, W,H, (1995) The Parental Stress Scale : initial psychometric evidence. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 12, 463 - 472.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Sport Commitment Model Questionnaire (Scanlan, 1993) [ Time Frame: baseline, six-weeks, three months ]
    Questionnaire measure from Scanlan, 1993

  2. Family functioning questionnaire [ Time Frame: baseline, six weeks, three months ]
    35 item questionnaire from Beavers, W. R., & Hampson, R. B. (1990). Successful families: Assessment and intervention. New York: Norton.

  3. Relationship Satisfaction questionnaire [ Time Frame: baseline, six weeks, three months ]
    7 item questionnaire from Burns, David D. (1993). Ten Days to Self-Esteem. New York, NY: HarperCollins.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Men and women with children under the age of 13 who live in the Greater Victoria area
  • Must not have participated in any organized sport within the last month

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Parents who do not have a child under the age of 13
  • Parents who have or are currently playing an organized sport
  • Parents under the age of 18

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02898285


Contacts
Contact: Alison Quinlan, MSc. bml@uvic.ca

Locations
Canada, British Columbia
Behavioural Medicine Laboratory Recruiting
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, V8P 5C2
Contact: Alison Quinlan    250-472-5288    bml@uvic.ca   
Principal Investigator: Ryan E Rhodes, PhD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Victoria
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Responsible Party: Ryan Rhodes, Primary Investigator, University of Victoria
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02898285     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: BC16-207
First Posted: September 13, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 3, 2018
Last Verified: May 2018