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Tai Chi for Stroke Rehabilitation on Balance and Cognition (TCSR)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT02868840
First Posted: August 16, 2016
Last Update Posted: September 13, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
National Research Foundation, Singapore
Chungnam National University Hospital
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rhayun Song, Chungnam National University
  Purpose
Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese martial art, is a low intense aerobic exercise characterized by continuous movements that embrace the mind, body, and spirit. Tai Chi addresses the integration and balance of mind and body using the fundamental principles of slow, smooth, and continuous movement control, and the transfer of body weight while maintaining an upright and relaxed posture. The present randomized clinical trial project aims to apply the suggested principles as the typical features of Tai Chi applied stroke rehabilitation, and to evaluate the effects on physical (balance), psychological, and cognitive function.

Condition Intervention
Stroke Behavioral: Tai Chi exercise Behavioral: symptom management

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Evaluating the Effect of Tai Chi Applied Stroke Rehabilitation on Physical and Cognitive Functioning

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Rhayun Song, Chungnam National University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • balance [ Time Frame: 3 months, 6 months ]
    postural stability test will be measured by standard computerized test


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • activities of daily living [ Time Frame: 3 months, 6 months ]
    activities of daily living will be measured by Modified rankin scale

  • knee muscle strength [ Time Frame: 3 months, 6 months ]
    knee flexor and extensor strength by isokinetic testing measured by Biodex


Other Outcome Measures:
  • cognition [ Time Frame: 3 months, 6 months ]
    measured by Korean version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment


Enrollment: 50
Actual Study Start Date: January 2016
Study Completion Date: June 30, 2017
Primary Completion Date: March 30, 2017 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Tai Chi group
Tai Chi exercise, twice a week, one hour per session. participated in Tai Chi either while seated or standing upon their comfort level.
Behavioral: Tai Chi exercise
exercise twice a week each for one hour
Other Name: seated Tai Chi
Active Comparator: Symptom management group
manage stroke symptom through phone and text message along with other rehabilitation therapy.
Behavioral: symptom management
sending text message weekly to manage symptoms related to stroke
Other Name: message counselling

Detailed Description:

Cerebrovascular disease is a major global concern. The individuals with stroke would suffer from disease associated symptoms which influence their functioning in everyday life. These symptom clusters were usually known to be sharing similar underlying mechanisms. It is clear that the development of effective stroke rehabilitation involves interdisciplinary team approach to manage physical, social, cognitive, and psychological functioning in this population.

Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese martial art, is a low intense aerobic exercise characterized by continuous movements that embrace the mind, body, and spirit. Tai Chi addresses the integration and balance of mind and body using the fundamental principles of slow, smooth, and continuous movement control, and the transfer of body weight while maintaining an upright and relaxed posture. The newly developed style of Tai Chi for health programs is the seated Tai Chi, which shares the common Tai Chi principles while being modified to adjust the movements for patients with limited mobility.

The present randomized clinical trial project aims to apply the suggested principles as the typical features of Tai Chi applied stroke rehabilitation, and to evaluate the effects on physical (balance), psychological, and cognitive function. Only a few studies ever addressed the feasibility of Tai Chi for stroke rehabilitation, and the relationship between cognition and balance in this population is still very early stage of investigation. The main purpose of our collaborating project is to explore the direct relationship between cognition and balance in stroke patients during their rehabilitation process.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   30 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • diagnosed as stroke at least for 3 months upto 2 years
  • eligible to participate rehabilitation therapy referred by primary physician

Exclusion Criteria:

  • not able to understand questionnaires
  • not able to stand alone for balance test
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02868840


Locations
Korea, Republic of
Chungnam National University Hospital
Daejeon, Korea, Republic of, 35015
Sponsors and Collaborators
Chungnam National University
National Research Foundation, Singapore
Chungnam National University Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Rhayun Song, PhD Chungnam National University
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Rhayun Song, Professor, Chungnam National University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02868840     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: ChungnamNU
First Submitted: July 27, 2016
First Posted: August 16, 2016
Last Update Posted: September 13, 2017
Last Verified: September 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Keywords provided by Rhayun Song, Chungnam National University:
stroke
Tai ji
postural balance
cognition

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Stroke
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases