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Sound Estimation and Accuracy Task

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02271685
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : October 22, 2014
Last Update Posted : May 21, 2015
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Eric VanEpps, Carnegie Mellon University

Brief Summary:
Participants will be assigned to complete computerized estimation tasks for which there is a component of accuracy, such as estimating the duration of sounds. Participants will be told that the task is used as an early diagnostic tool to detect those at risk for a medical condition (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease). Instructions will be given to participants telling them that accuracy on the task is associated with the disease, whereas those who are not at risk of the disease tend to either overestimate or underestimate the duration of the sounds. The investigators examine whether such instructions about the purpose and diagnosticity of the tasks biases participants' responses to the tasks, leading them to purposefully be more inaccurate in their estimates.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Parkinson's Alzheimer Disease Other: Instructions about Overestimates Other: Instructions about Parkinson's Other: Instructions about Underestimates Other: Instructions about Alzheimers Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Participants will be assigned to complete computerized tasks for which there is a component of accuracy, such as estimating the length, in time, of sounds. Participants will be told that the task is used as an early diagnostic tool to detect those at risk for a medical condition (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease). Instructions will be given to participants telling them that accuracy on the task is associated with the disease in question, whereas those who are not at risk of the disease tend to either overestimate or underestimate the duration of the sounds. The investigators examine whether such instructions about the purpose and diagnosticity of the tasks biases participants' responses to the tasks. The investigators collect additional survey measures as statistical controls and potential explanatory variables for variation in the performance on the tasks, and also test whether financial incentives for accuracy on these tasks improve the accuracy of responses to these tasks.

Following the task, all participants will be told that the tasks used are actually NOT diagnostic of the diseases in question, and that deception was used to learn how people respond to instructions about how a task can be used for diagnostic purposes.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 600 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Screening
Official Title: Estimation and Accuracy in Sound Task Perceived to be Medically Diagnostic
Study Start Date : February 2015
Actual Primary Completion Date : May 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : May 2015


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Overestimate Parkinson's
People are told that overestimates on the sound estimation task are associated with being healthy and having a low risk of Parkinson's disease, whereas those who are accurate are more likely to develop the disease later in life.
Other: Instructions about Overestimates
Participants are told that overestimating the duration of sounds are associated with low disease risk.

Other: Instructions about Parkinson's
Participants are told that the task is about risk of Parkinson's disease.

Experimental: Overestimate Alzheimers
People are told that overestimates on the sound estimation task are associated with being healthy and having a low risk of Alzheimers disease, whereas those who are accurate are more likely to develop the disease later in life.
Other: Instructions about Overestimates
Participants are told that overestimating the duration of sounds are associated with low disease risk.

Other: Instructions about Alzheimers
Participants are told that the task is about risk of Alzheimers disease.

Experimental: Underestimate Parkinson's
People are told that underestimates on the sound estimation task are associated with being healthy and having a low risk of Parkinson's disease, whereas those who are accurate are more likely to develop the disease later in life.
Other: Instructions about Parkinson's
Participants are told that the task is about risk of Parkinson's disease.

Other: Instructions about Underestimates
Participants are told that underestimating the duration of sounds are associated with low disease risk.

Experimental: Underestimate Alzheimers
People are told that underestimates on the sound estimation task are associated with being healthy and having a low risk of Alzheimers disease, whereas those who are accurate are more likely to develop the disease later in life.
Other: Instructions about Underestimates
Participants are told that underestimating the duration of sounds are associated with low disease risk.

Other: Instructions about Alzheimers
Participants are told that the task is about risk of Alzheimers disease.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Time Estimate [ Time Frame: 30 minutes ]
    The estimate of the length of time elapsed during the sound file


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Time Generation [ Time Frame: 30 minutes ]
    The length of time selected for the sound file to run by participants in a secondary task

  2. Perceived Risk of Disease [ Time Frame: 30 minutes ]
    Scale question asking participants their perceived risk of having the diseases in the study



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18 or older
  • Able to access tasks on computer
  • Able to hear sounds played on computer

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Computer speakers absent or not functioning

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02271685


Locations
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United States, Pennsylvania
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, 15213
Sponsors and Collaborators
Carnegie Mellon University
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Eric M VanEpps, MS Carnegie Mellon University
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Responsible Party: Eric VanEpps, PhD Candidate, Carnegie Mellon University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02271685    
Other Study ID Numbers: HS14-553
First Posted: October 22, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 21, 2015
Last Verified: May 2015
Keywords provided by Eric VanEpps, Carnegie Mellon University:
Diagnostic Information
Risk Perception
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Alzheimer Disease
Dementia
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Tauopathies
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Neurocognitive Disorders
Mental Disorders