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Respiratory Muscles and Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02243527
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 18, 2014
Results First Posted : July 4, 2019
Last Update Posted : July 4, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Canada
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jordan Guenette, University of British Columbia

Brief Summary:

The effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) remain controversial. Many studies have examined the effect IMT has on exercise performance, but any changes to the body that come from IMT have yet to be looked at.

This study will look at how someone breathes can change after IMT. Understanding how IMT changes the body can help us use IMT in different treatments.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Respiratory Muscles Breathing Exercises Other: Inspiratory Muscle Training Other: Sham Inspiratory Muscle Training Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 25 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Muscle Mechanics and Haemodynamics in Healthy Adults
Study Start Date : September 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : July 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : July 2016

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Inspiratory Muscle Training Other: Inspiratory Muscle Training
6-weeks of inspiratory muscle training

Sham Comparator: Sham-Control Inspiratory Muscle Training
Inspiratory muscle training at a low intensity meant to elicit no physiological changes.
Other: Sham Inspiratory Muscle Training
A sham training procedure that is meant to elicit no physiologic changes




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Diaphragm Electromyography [ Time Frame: Post Intervention - ie. immediately after 5 weeks of inspiratory muscle training ]

    Using a multipair esophageal electrode catheter we will determine any changes to the electric activity of the diaphragm.

    Diaphragm electromyography (EMG) has been expressed as %max. This unit is determined as the ratio of average EMG value (uV) divided by the maximal EMG activity (uV) generated during a maximal respiratory maneuver (inspiratory capacity during exercise).



Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Accessory Respiratory Muscle Activation [ Time Frame: Post-intervention - ie. immediately after 5 weeks of inspiratory muscle training ]

    Using surface electromyography to determine the activation patterns of accessory respiratory muscles (scalene and sternocleidomastoid).

    Data are expressed as %max. This value is determined by taking the average electromyography (EMG) activity divided by the maximal EMG activity generated during a maximal inspiratory maneuver (inspiratory capacity during exercise).



Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Dyspnoea [ Time Frame: Post-intervention - ie. immediately after 5 weeks of inspiratory muscle training ]

    Using the modified Borg scale to assess changes in perceived dyspnoea after inspiratory muscle training.

    The modified Borg scale is a 0-10 category ratio scale. The floor (0) of the scale is anchored subjectively to the subjects interpretation of "no breathing discomfort at all", and the ceiling (10) to represent "the most intense breathing discomfort they have experienced or could imagine experiencing".


  2. Muscle Oxygenation [ Time Frame: Post-intervention - ie. immediately after 5 weeks of inspiratory muscle training ]
    Using near-infrared spectroscopy to examine if there are any relative changes in concentration (∆umol/Litre) of deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb) after training. Deoxygenated hemoglobin is used as a surrogate of oxygen extraction specific to the local vasculature of the vastus lateralis,



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Ages Eligible for Study:   19 Years to 39 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Recreationally active, 'Moderate' or 'High' category on International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short form questionnaire
  • Able to read and understand English
  • Pulmonary function within normal limits

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of or currently smoking
  • History or current symptoms of cardiopulmonary disease (including asthma and exercise induced asthma)
  • Currently participating and training in a sport at a provincial, national, or international level
  • Ulcer or tumor in the esophagus, a nasal septum deviation, or recent nasopharyngeal surgery
  • Allergies to latex or local anesthetic
  • Contraindications to exercise testing

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02243527


Locations
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Canada, British Columbia
Centre for Heart Lung Innovation
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6Z 1Y6
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of British Columbia
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Canada
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Jordan A Guenette, PhD University of British Columbia/Centre for Heart Lung Innovation

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Responsible Party: Jordan Guenette, Dr. Jordan Guenette, University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02243527     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: H14-00067
First Posted: September 18, 2014    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: July 4, 2019
Last Update Posted: July 4, 2019
Last Verified: April 2019
Keywords provided by Jordan Guenette, University of British Columbia:
Exercise
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Respiratory Aspiration
Respiration Disorders
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Pathologic Processes