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The Effect of Cigarette Smoking / Smoking Cessation on Skeletal Muscle Mass, Strength and Functional Capabilities

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02128048
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 1, 2014
Last Update Posted : May 1, 2014
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rambam Health Care Campus

Brief Summary:

Tobacco smoke is probably the single most significant source of toxic chemicals that humans are exposed to. Smoking is associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. In addition to the known harmful effects of cigarette smoking, several epidemiological studies identified tobacco use as a risk factor for sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength with advancing age. Previous studies examined skeletal muscles of smokers in comparison with muscles of non-smokers and found structural and metabolic damage in muscles of smokers.

Quitting of smoking is known to be associated with weight gain. A previous study examined the effects of smoking cessation on body composition of post-menopausal women using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). It was found that women who successfully quit smoking for a period of 16 months have significantly increased their body weight, fat mass, muscle mass and functional muscle mass in comparison with non-quitters women. For the first time, it was shown that smoking cessation is associated with an increase of functional muscle mass. Yet, the effects of quitting of smoking on muscle mass and muscle functional capabilities of younger subjects remain unclear. Therefore, we aim to investigate the effects of smoking cessation on muscle mass, muscle function and strength in heavy smoker's subjects. Our findings may shed light on the beneficial effects of smoking cessation regarding the status and function of skeletal muscle in heavy smokers and as a possible strategy to prevent or delay the progression of sarcopenia.

Research hypothesis: Smoking cessation among adult heavy smokers will lead to increase in skeletal muscle mass and improvement of muscle function and strength compared with continued smokers.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Smoking Cessation Body Composition, Beneficial Muscle Weakness Device: Assessment of body composition and muscle function

Detailed Description:
Body composition and muscle function were assessed at the beginning of a smoking cessation program and again after 12 months. Changes in body composition and muscle function were compared between continued smokers and quitters.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 81 participants
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: The Effect of Cigarette Smoking / Smoking Cessation on Skeletal Muscle Mass, Strength and Functional Capabilities
Study Start Date : June 2012
Actual Primary Completion Date : February 2014
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2014

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Heavy smokers
Assessment of body composition and muscle function
Device: Assessment of body composition and muscle function
Assessment of body composition by DEXA and BIA Measurement of muscle function by hand-grip dynamometer and physical tests Comparison between quitters and continued smokers




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Parameters of body composition and muscle function in continued smokers versus quitters [ Time Frame: 12 months ]

    Parameters of body composition including fat mass, muscle mass, bone mineral content and density measured by DEXA and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA).

    Muscle function measured by hand-grip dynamometer and physical tests.




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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Subjects were recruited from support groups of smoking cessation conducted at "Clalit Health Services" at Haifa and Western Galilee district.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy men and women between the ages of 18-65
  • Heavy smokers (smoking more than 15 cigarettes per day)
  • Taking part in smoking cessation support group at "Clalit Health Services", Haifa and Western Galilee district

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Medical conditions affecting skeletal muscle metabolism or function.
  • Use of corticosteroids or any other medication or nutritional supplement affecting skeletal muscle
  • Consuming more than two alcoholic drinks per day

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02128048


Locations
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Israel
Rambam Health Care Campus
Haifa, Israel
Sponsors and Collaborators
Rambam Health Care Campus
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Dror Aizenbud, Professor Rambam Health Care Campus

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Rambam Health Care Campus
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02128048     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Version 01 Dated 27-March-2012
First Posted: May 1, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 1, 2014
Last Verified: April 2014
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Muscle Weakness
Muscular Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Neuromuscular Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Signs and Symptoms