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The Impact of Sucrose Ingestion During Exercise on Liver and Muscle Glycogen Concentration.

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02110836
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 10, 2014
Last Update Posted : August 7, 2015
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
University of Newcastle Upon-Tyne
Maastricht University
Sugar Nutrition, UK
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Javier Gonzalez, PhD, Northumbria University

Brief Summary:

Carbohydrate is stored in the body as glycogen, which is mainly found in the liver and muscle. During endurance exercise, muscle glycogen is used as fuel for the working muscles and liver glycogen is broken down to provide glucose to maintain blood glucose (sugar) levels. Both liver and muscle glycogen are important for the ability to perform intense/prolonged endurance exercise. Therefore, nutritional strategies which can maximise the availability of glycogen in muscle and liver can benefit endurance exercise capacity.

The carbohydrates typically found in sports drinks are glucose and sometimes fructose. If glucose only is ingested during exercise, then the maximum rate at which can be absorbed from the intestine into the blood stream is ~1 g/min. However, if different sources of carbohydrate (fructose) are used, which are absorbed through a different pathway, absorption of carbohydrate can be up to ~1.8 g/min. With more carbohydrate available as a fuel, this translates into an improvement in performance.

Sucrose is a naturally occurring sugar that is made up of a single glucose and single fructose molecule. Therefore, theoretically, this can use the two different pathways of absorption and also maximise carbohydrate delivery. It is not yet known however, what impact this has on our liver and muscle glycogen stores during exercise. Therefore the aim of this study is to assess whether sucrose ingestion influences liver and muscle glycogen depletion during endurance exercise.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Liver and Muscle Glycogen Use During Exercise. Dietary Supplement: Glucose ingestion Dietary Supplement: Sucrose ingestion Not Applicable

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 14 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Study Start Date : April 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 2014
Actual Study Completion Date : April 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Glucose ingestion
Glucose ingestion during exercise at a rate of 1.8 g/min.
Dietary Supplement: Glucose ingestion
Glucose ingestion during exercise at 1.8 g/min

Experimental: Sucrose ingestion
Sucrose ingestion during exercise at a rate of 1.8 g/min.
Dietary Supplement: Sucrose ingestion
Sucrose ingestion during exercise at 1.8 g/min




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in liver glycogen concentration [ Time Frame: 3 hours ]
    The change in liver glycogen concentration will be determined pre-to-post 3 h of exercise using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Plasma glucose concentration. [ Time Frame: 3 hours ]
    Plasma glucose concentrations will be determined every 30 min during 3 h of exercise.

  2. Plasma lactate concentration [ Time Frame: 3 hours ]
    Plasma lactate concentrations will be determined every 30 min during 3 h of exercise.

  3. Plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentration [ Time Frame: 3 hours ]
    Plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations will be determined every 30 min during 3 h of exercise.

  4. Indirect calorimetry [ Time Frame: 3 hours ]
    Measurements of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and respiratory exchange ratio through indirect calorimetry measured every 30 minutes during exercise.

  5. Muscle glycogen concentration [ Time Frame: 3 hours ]
    The change in muscle glycogen concentration will be determined pre-to-post 3 h of exercise using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  6. Change in intramyocellular lipid concentration [ Time Frame: 3 hours ]
    The change in intramyocellular lipid concentration will be determined pre-to-post 3 h of exercise using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy
  • Male
  • 18 - 35 years of age
  • Endurance trained cyclist/triathlete
  • VO2 max ≥ 50 ml/kg/min

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Use of medication
  • Smoking
  • Metabolic disorders

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02110836


Locations
United Kingdom
Northumbria University
Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, United Kingdom, NE1 8ST
Sponsors and Collaborators
Javier Gonzalez, PhD
University of Newcastle Upon-Tyne
Maastricht University
Sugar Nutrition, UK
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Luc van Loon, PhD Maastricht University

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Javier Gonzalez, PhD, Research Fellow, Northumbria University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02110836     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: NUSUCA
First Posted: April 10, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 7, 2015
Last Verified: August 2015