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IPHAAB-study Influence of Physical Activity on Atherosclerosis Biomarkers

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02097199
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 26, 2014
Last Update Posted : January 7, 2016
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Austrian Federal Ministry of Defence and Sports
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jeanette Strametz-Juranek, Medical University of Vienna

Brief Summary:
This study investigates the influence of an increased physical activity and sports workload in formerly nonsporting healthy individuals on current promising biomarkers of atherosclerosis research.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Influence of 8 Months of Increased Physical Activity Workload on Osteoprotegerin and Endocan Levels Other: Increased sports workload

  Show Detailed Description

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 98 participants
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Influence of Physical Activity on Promising Atherosclerosis Biomarkers
Study Start Date : August 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Sports group
The cohort will consist of about 55 female and 55 male individuals aged 30-65 years with mostly sedentary work (>6 hours/day) doing no or less physical activity (<30 minutes quick walking/day) who want to engage more in physical activity (at least 150 minutes of at least moderate intensity per week). The gain in workload will be objectified and quantified by performing a bicycle stress test at the beginning of the study and after 8 months of physical engagement.
Other: Increased sports workload
At least 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. The "Recommendations for Adults From the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association" clearly define physical exercise intensity levels. The present study follows these recommendations. Consequently, moderate physical activity can be reached by e.g. quick walking, slow bicycling, slow swimming...; it is also possible to reach the expected workload by engaging in vigorous exercise (e.g. jogging/running, quick swimming, playing soccer/tennis...). The gain in performance will objectified by performing a bicycle stress test at the beginning and the end of the study.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline osteoprotegerin and endocan level to osteoprotegerin and endocan levels after 8 months of increased physical activity workload [ Time Frame: Baseline, Month 8 ]
    Osteoprotegerin and endocan levels will be measured at baseline, every 2 months of training and at the end of the observation after 8 months


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline Progerin, Myeloid-related peptide 8 and 14, Angiopoietin-like protein 2, Cathepsin S and K, Cystatin C and Placental growth factor level to levels after 8 months of increased physical activity workload [ Time Frame: Baseline, Month 8 ]
    Progerin, Myeloid-related peptide 8 and 14, Angiopoietin-like protein 2, Cathepsin S and K, Cystatin C and Placental growth levels will be measured at baseline, every 2 months of training and at the end of the observation after 8 months


Biospecimen Retention:   Samples Without DNA
whole blood


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Ages Eligible for Study:   30 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
The study population will consist of about 55 female and 55 male individuals aged 30-65 years with mostly sedentary work (>6 hours/day) doing no or less physical activity (<30 minutes quick walking/day).
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 30-65 years
  • less than 30 minutes of quick walking/day
  • Physical ability to perform sports and bicycle stress tests

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Age <30 or >65 years
  • Pregnancy
  • weight >130 kg
  • untreated/uncontrolled hypertension

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02097199


Locations
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Austria
Medical University of Vienna
Vienna, Austria, 1090
Sponsors and Collaborators
Medical University of Vienna
Austrian Federal Ministry of Defence and Sports
Investigators
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Study Chair: Jeanette Strametz-Juranek, Prof.Dr. Medical University of Vienna

Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Jeanette Strametz-Juranek, Prim.Univ.Prof.Dr., Medical University of Vienna
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02097199     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1830/2013
First Posted: March 26, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 7, 2016
Last Verified: January 2016
Keywords provided by Jeanette Strametz-Juranek, Medical University of Vienna:
activity, osteoprotegerin, endocan, atherosclerosis, biomarker
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Atherosclerosis
Arteriosclerosis
Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases