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Can Creatine Supplementation Improve Body Composition and Physical Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients?

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified December 2014 by Thomas James Wilkinson, Bangor University.
Recruitment status was:  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01767844
First Posted: January 14, 2013
Last Update Posted: December 3, 2014
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Thomas James Wilkinson, Bangor University
  Purpose

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients typically experience a significant loss of muscle. In healthy individuals, food supplementation with creatine (Cr) increases muscle size and improves physical function and quality of life. The aim of this study is to investigate whether RA patients may benefit similarly.

50 participants will be given a food supplement to take for 12 weeks; this supplement will either be creatine or a placebo (a regular fruit flavoured powder that has no benefits).

Over 12 weeks, body fat and muscle size (body composition), physical function, and fitness (aerobic capacity of the heart and lungs to transport oxygen to the exercising muscles) will be tested. In addition, quality of life questionnaires will be completed, disease activity will be assessed and blood samples will be taken. Muscle samples (muscle biopsy) will be obtained, from those who volunteer to provide them, at baseline and post-treatment.


Condition Intervention
Rheumatoid Arthritis Dietary Supplement: Creatine Dietary Supplement: Placebo

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Can Creatine Supplementation Improve Body Composition and Physical Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients? A Randomised Controlled Pilot Trial

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Thomas James Wilkinson, Bangor University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in 'Objectively assessed whole body function' [ Time Frame: Measured at Baseline, Day 6, Week 12, Week 24 ]

    Physical function will be assessed using the following tests:

    1. strength tests of the knee muscles and hand-grip
    2. the Up-and-Go Test (UG) - For the UG, participants are required rise from a seated position on a fixed chair, walk forward to a cone placed 8ft (2.44 m) away, and return to the chair and a seated position.
    3. the sit-to-stand in 30 sec test (SST-30) - For the SST-30 participants will rise from the same seated position as during the UG as many times as possible in 30 s whilst keeping their arms folded across the chest.
    4. 50-ft walk test - During the 50-ft walk test, time taken to complete the walk along a straight line marked by cones is recorded
    5. To assess fitness participants will complete the Siconolfi step test.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in body composition [ Time Frame: Baseline, Day 6, Week 12, Week 24 ]
    Body fat and muscle size (body composition) will be assessed using type of X-ray called 'dual-entry X-ray absorptiometry' (DXA) scans and by looking at body water levels. DXA allows the research team to estimate the amount of lean tissue (muscle) and fat that is in the body. The scan is completely painless.


Enrollment: 43
Study Start Date: January 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date: February 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: February 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Creatine
Creatine, often found in meat and fish, make up an essential part of the systems that provide energy to the muscles for movement and exercise.
Dietary Supplement: Creatine
Creatine, often found in meat and fish, make up an essential part of the systems that provide energy to the muscles for movement and exercise.
Other Names:
  • Creatine Monohydrate (MyProtein.uk)
  • SN: 5055534301999 BB: 09/2014
Placebo Comparator: Fruit powder drink
A regular fruit flavoured powder that has no benefits
Dietary Supplement: Placebo
Other Names:
  • Placebo Comparator: Fruit powder drink - A regular fruit flavoured powder that has no benefits.
  • Manufactured by Foster Clarks Ltd (www.fosterclark.com)

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • fulfil the American Rheumatism Association 1987 revised criteria for the diagnosis of RA
  • be functional class I or II
  • be age 18 years or over

Exclusion Criteria:

  • be cognitively impaired; (b) have any other cachectic diseases and any condition preventing safe participation in the study
  • have a glomerular filtration rate above 60mL/min/1.73m2, assessed from medical records, and no other evidence of kidney damage
  • be taking drugs or other nutritional supplements known to increase muscle mass
  • be participating in regular and intense physical training program be pregnant
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01767844


Locations
United Kingdom
Bangor University
Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom, LL572PZ
Sponsors and Collaborators
Bangor University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Andrew B Lemmey, Prof. Bangor University
Principal Investigator: Thomas O'Brien, Dr Bangor University
Principal Investigator: Thomas J Wilkinson Bangor Unversity
  More Information

Publications:
Willer B, Stucki G, Hoppeler H, Brühlmann P, Krähenbühl S. Effects of creatine supplementation on muscle weakness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2000 Mar;39(3):293-8.
Lemmey AB, Jones J, Maddison PJ. Rheumatoid cachexia: what is it and why is it important? J Rheumatol. 2011 Sep;38(9):2074; author reply 2075. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.110308.
Lemmey AB, Williams SL, Marcora SM, Jones J, Maddison PJ. Are the benefits of a high-intensity progressive resistance training program sustained in rheumatoid arthritis patients? A 3-year followup study. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Jan;64(1):71-5. doi: 10.1002/acr.20523.
Lemmey AB, Marcora SM, Chester K, Wilson S, Casanova F, Maddison PJ. Effects of high-intensity resistance training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Dec 15;61(12):1726-34. doi: 10.1002/art.24891.
Marcora S, Lemmey A, Maddison P. Dietary treatment of rheumatoid cachexia with beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, glutamine and arginine: a randomised controlled trial. Clin Nutr. 2005 Jun;24(3):442-54. Epub 2005 Apr 21.
Cooney JK, Law RJ, Matschke V, Lemmey AB, Moore JP, Ahmad Y, Jones JG, Maddison P, Thom JM. Benefits of exercise in rheumatoid arthritis. J Aging Res. 2011 Feb 13;2011:681640. doi: 10.4061/2011/681640.
Nissen SL, Sharp RL. Effect of dietary supplements on lean mass and strength gains with resistance exercise: a meta-analysis. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2003 Feb;94(2):651-9. Epub 2002 Oct 25.

Responsible Party: Thomas James Wilkinson, PhD Research Student, Bangor University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01767844     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 12/WA/0320
110850 ( Other Identifier: IRAS )
First Submitted: January 8, 2013
First Posted: January 14, 2013
Last Update Posted: December 3, 2014
Last Verified: December 2014

Keywords provided by Thomas James Wilkinson, Bangor University:
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Arthritis
Rheumatology
Creatine

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Arthritis
Arthritis, Rheumatoid
Joint Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Rheumatic Diseases
Connective Tissue Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases


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