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Satiety Response of White and Brown Rice Compared to Glucose Control

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01508975
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : January 12, 2012
Last Update Posted : February 15, 2013
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Brief Summary:
The investigators hypothesize that consumption of either white or brown rice will be more satiating than glucose control.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Food Selection Other: White Rice, Brown Rice, Glucose Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
This study is an acute, randomized, repeated measures design with 20 subjects. Subjects will consume 3 test breakfasts, white rice, brown rice, or glucose control, each containing 400 calories. Treatments will be one week apart. After consumption of the controlled breakfast, subjects will complete visual analogue scales (VAS) for satiety response. Additionally, they will consume a pizza lunch and record food intake for the next 24 hours. Breath gas samples will be collected to estimate fermentation of fiber in the large intestine. Also, subjective data on gastrointestinal tolerance will be collected.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 20 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Satiety Response of White and Brown Rice Compared to Glucose Control
Study Start Date : January 2011
Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2012
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2012

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

Drug Information available for: Dextrose

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: white rice
White rice
Other: White Rice, Brown Rice, Glucose
white rice, brown rice, glucose

Experimental: Brown rice
Brown Rice
Other: White Rice, Brown Rice, Glucose
white rice, brown rice, glucose

Experimental: Glucose
Glucose
Other: White Rice, Brown Rice, Glucose
white rice, brown rice, glucose




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Satiety [ Time Frame: 4 hours following breakfast ]
    Visual analogue scales (subjective measurements)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • healthy subjects

Exclusion Criteria:

  • inability to consume rice for breakfast

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01508975


Locations
United States, Minnesota
Department of Food Science and Nutrition
St. Paul, Minnesota, United States, 55108
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Joanne Slavin, PhD University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Responsible Party: University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01508975     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: USARice1
First Posted: January 12, 2012    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 15, 2013
Last Verified: February 2013

Keywords provided by University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute:
satiety
obesity
food intake