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Comparison of Elution Swab (ESwab) and Amies Transport Swabs for Screening Patients for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Colonization (MRSA VRE)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00941122
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 17, 2009
Last Update Posted : July 20, 2011
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Information provided by:

Study Description
Brief Summary:
1.To assess whether the Elution swab (ESwab) is superior to Amies transport swabs for the detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) in colonized patients and to determine whether nasal cultures alone is sufficient for detection of MRSA isolates in hospitalized patients. 2.To assess patient comfort in the use of the ESwab vs. Amies Transport swab for screening patients for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Eluted Swab Device: Eluted Swab

Detailed Description:
MRSA is a major cause of nosocomial and life threatening infections. Infections with MRSA have been associated with a significantly higher morbidity, mortality and costs than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA).1 Selection of these organisms has been greatest in the healthcare setting; however, MRSA have also become more prevalent in the community.2 To control the transmission of MRSA, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) has recommended guidelines, which include an active surveillance program to identify potential reservoirs and a rigorous infection control program to control the spread of MRSA. Accurate identification of patients colonized with MRSA is essential in managing the transmission of the organism. It is currently unknown whether the currently utilized collection rayon swab is the optimal swab in detecting colonized patients The purpose of this study is to directly compare whether Eluted (ESwab) swab is superior to the currently utilized rayon swab in identifying MRSA/VRE colonized patients.

Study Design

Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 30 participants
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Comparison of Elution Swab (ESwab) and Amies Transport Swabs for Screening Patients for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Colonization
Study Start Date : July 2009
Primary Completion Date : January 2011
Study Completion Date : March 2011

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: MRSA
Drug Information available for: Vancomycin
U.S. FDA Resources

Groups and Cohorts

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
MRSA/VRE patients
patients known to be colonized with MRSA/VRE
Device: Eluted Swab
Comparison of Eluted Swab with AMIES swab for detection of MRSA/VRE


Outcome Measures

Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. 1. To assess whether the Elution swab (ESwab) is superior to Amies transport swabs for the detection of MRSA/VRE [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
  2. 1. To assess whether the Elution swab (ESwab) is superior to Amies transport swabs for the detection of MRSA/VRE in colonized patients [ Time Frame: 12 months ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. To assess patient comfort in the use of the ESwab vs. Amies Transport swab for screening patients for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. [ Time Frame: 12 months ]

Eligibility Criteria

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Hospitalized patients known to be colonized with MRSA/VRE
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Hospitallized patients known to be colonized with MRSA/VRE

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unable to provide informed consent
Contacts and Locations

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00941122


Locations
Canada, Ontario
St. Joseph's Healthcare
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8N 4A6
Sponsors and Collaborators
Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation
McMaster University
St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Christine Lee, MD McMaster University
More Information

Responsible Party: Christine Lee, McMaster University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00941122     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: MRSA.VRE.Detection
First Posted: July 17, 2009    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 20, 2011
Last Verified: July 2011

Keywords provided by McMaster University:
MRSA, VRE

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Staphylococcal Infections
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections
Bacterial Infections
Vancomycin
Methicillin
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anti-Infective Agents