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Efficacy and Safety of Growth Hormone Treatment in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00420251
First Posted: January 11, 2007
Last Update Posted: January 11, 2007
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
Pfizer
Information provided by:
Ludwig-Maximilians - University of Munich
  Purpose
Growth retardation is well known in patients with severe forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Especially those who were under additional treatment with glucocorticoids for high disease activity. The hypothesis is, that treatment with growth hormone can, at leat in part, overcome growth hormone resistance state and increase final height. In a controlled study we follow patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with and without growth hormone treatment until final height. Additionally, we are interested in bone density development in those treated with growth hormone.

Condition Intervention Phase
Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Still Disease, Juvenile-Onset Drug: Genotropin Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Controlled Study on the Effect on Growth and Bone Development

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Ludwig-Maximilians - University of Munich:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Final height

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Bone geometry and density

Estimated Enrollment: 50
Study Start Date: March 1996
Estimated Study Completion Date: July 2006
Detailed Description:
Growth retardation is well known in patients with severe forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Especially those who were under additional treatment with glucocorticoids for high disease activity. This is the case in patients with a polyarticular and a systemic form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The permanent consequence is short stature at final height. Up to 30% of these patients will have a final height below the 3rd percentile, even after discontinuation of glucocorticoid treatment. The hypothesis is, that treatment with growth hormone can, at leat in part, overcome growth hormone resistance state and increase final height. In a controlled study we follow patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with and without growth hormone treatment until final height. From safety aspects we were interested in the effect of growth hormone on the disease activity. Additionally, we are interested in bone density development in those treated with growth hormone up to final height.
  Eligibility

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Ages Eligible for Study:   4 Years to 14 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Polyarticular or systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis,
  • Growth velocity below the 25th percentile and or short stature ,
  • Treatment with glucocorticoids for at least the previous 6 months before inclusion,
  • Prepubertal stage,
  • Bone age below 10 in girls and 12 in boys,
  • Growth hormone levels after stimulation with clonidine or arginine above 10 ng/ml

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Previous treatment with growth hormone,
  • Endocrinopathy,
  • Additional chronic disease beside juvenile idiopathic arthritis,
  • Malignant disase,
  • Chromosomal aberration or othe syndromal disease,
  • Previous treatment with Oxandrolone,
  • Small for gestational age,
  • Elevated fasting glucose level
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00420251


Locations
Germany
Center For Rheumatic Diseases in Childhood
Garmisch Partenkirchen, Germany, 82152
Sponsors and Collaborators
Ludwig-Maximilians - University of Munich
Pfizer
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Susanne M Bechtold, MD University Children´s Hospital, Munich
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00420251     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 13042004
First Submitted: January 9, 2007
First Posted: January 11, 2007
Last Update Posted: January 11, 2007
Last Verified: January 2007

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Arthritis
Arthritis, Juvenile
Joint Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Rheumatic Diseases
Connective Tissue Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Hormones
Hormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists
Physiological Effects of Drugs