Working...
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu
Trial record 40 of 674 for:    applied AND web-

Mobile-Web Emotion Self-management Tool (Emotions)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02346591
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : January 27, 2015
Last Update Posted : January 27, 2015
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Amy Birney, Oregon Center for Applied Science, Inc.

Brief Summary:
The investigators developed a responsive mobile-web app, "Jauntly," which was designed to take advantage of the known connections between positive emotions, stress reduction and stress resilience. The app's goal was to lead users through research-proven positive emotion-enhancing exercises and relevant educational materials. Intervention activities covered five well-being-generating content areas: 1) promoting the experience and recognition of gratitude; 2) encouraging positive social relationships and feelings of social support; 3) improving stress resilience via mindfulness and other relaxation-focused activities; 4) focusing and capitalizing on individual strengths (as opposed to limitations and weaknesses); and 5) general positive mood inducing activities. Program content was adapted from a variety of stress-relevant research areas including health psychology/psychosomatic medicine, social/personality psychology, positive psychology, and clinical psychology.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Stress Depression Behavioral: Jauntly Behavioral: Online stress management information Phase 2

Detailed Description:

The overarching goal of the Jauntly mobile app was to experience exercises that encourage one to take care of oneself emotionally, improve positive emotions, and decrease stress and other negative emotions. The user interacted with the app through evidence-based activities (e.g. writing gratefulness notes, helping others, practicing mindfulness). The activities were selected based on the goals the user selected upon initiation of program and throughout engagement with the app. In order to promote sustained use of the program and mastery of the positive emotion based skills, the design of the program included activities that range in difficulty so that the user could progress and improve (i.e., simple "1 and done" types of goals versus multi-week goals).

Research in positive psychology interventions suggests that increases in well-being are highest when the activity: 1) fits the person's interests and values and 2) is performed neither too frequently nor too seldom. Because of our desire to have a product with long-lasting usability and sustained engagement, it was critical that there were a diverse number of activities from which individuals could choose based on interest, current mood, and past success. The Jauntly user experience is structured around free use of the app partnered with regular emails, in-app messaging, videos, and articles. Emails remind users to utilize program content (including users in the control group who were reminded to visit the stress-management website). Use of the app and viewing of videos and other content is not restricted and users are able to self-tailor use according to their interest.


Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 298 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Official Title: Emotion Management Training: An Innovative Stress Reduction Program
Study Start Date : February 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 2013
Actual Study Completion Date : November 2013

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Jauntly
Mobile app designed to take advantage of the known connections between positive emotions, stress reduction and stress resilience; goal was to lead users through research-proven positive emotion enhancing exercises and relevant educational materials. Intervention activities covered five well-being generating content areas: 1) promoting the experience and recognition of gratitude; 2) encouraging positive social relationships and feelings of social support; 3) improving stress resilience via mindfulness and other relaxation-focused activities; 4) focusing and capitalizing on individual strengths (as opposed to limitations and weaknesses); and 5) general positive mood inducing activities.
Behavioral: Jauntly
Mobile app designed to encourage positive emotion-enhancing and stress reduction activities.

Active Comparator: Online stress management information
The control participants were emailed links to vetted online information about stress and encouraged to visit the websites.
Behavioral: Online stress management information
Online educational information about stress management




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Overall perceived stress [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    The 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) assessed perceptions of feeling like you can not cope with things in your life and feelings of "stress" and nervousness on a scale of 1 (Never) to 5 (Very Often). The PSS is the most widely used self-report stress scale available, and has been shown to predict many important well-being outcomes.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Psychological well-being assessed as positive and negative affect [ Time Frame: 8 weeks, 12 weeks ]
    Positive and negative affect over the past few weeks was assessed at each time point using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale-expanded version, with a few nonrelevant items (e.g., surprise) removed, resulting in a total of 53 emotion adjectives on a scale of 1 (not at all/very slightly) to 5 (extremely). Subscales assessing positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) were created as well as specific basic emotion scales assessing fear (6 items), hostility (6 items), guilt (6 items), sadness (5 items), joviality (8 items), self-assuredness (6 items), attentiveness (4 items), fatigue (4 items) and serenity (3 items).

  2. Self-reported depressive symptomatology [ Time Frame: 8 weeks, 12 weeks ]
    Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the self-reported Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale (CESD-10). Participants are asked to rate each symptom on a scale of rarely/none of time to (1) to all of the time (4).

  3. Self-reported social well-being [ Time Frame: 8 weeks, 12 weeks ]
    The 10-statement UCLA Loneliness Scale asked users to respond to the root statement "How often do you feel…." in conjunction with various statements describing social relationships; e.g., "How often do you feel as if nobody really understands you?" Responses were on a 4-point scale (1-often; 4=never)

  4. Self-reported physical well-being [ Time Frame: 8 weeks, 12 weeks ]
    Eleven items were selected from the SF-36, a measure of functional status which contains 8 subscales. Items from 2 of the subscales were included: bodily pain and general health perceptions. Response scales were different for each of the subscales.

  5. Workplace outcomes [ Time Frame: 8 weeks, 12 weeks ]
    Absenteeism and presenteeism were assessed using the Workplace Outcomes Suite. A score from a 9-item work engagement assessment including questions about hours of missed work due to absenteeism, lateness, leaving early, and questions about lost productivity due to lack of concentration or personal distractions involving disrupting phone calls, email.

  6. Users' perception of app usability [ Time Frame: 8 weeks, 12 weeks ]
    Treatment participants completed the System Usability Scale, a quantitative measure of program ease of use (Sauro, 2011). The scale includes 10 items and users were asked to what degree they agreed or disagreed with program use and satisfaction statements on a 6-point scale (1=strongly disagree; 6=strongly agree).

  7. User satisfaction with the app experience [ Time Frame: 8 weeks, 12 weeks ]
    Users were asked 6 items pertaining to satisfaction and likelihood of continued use or recommendation of the Jauntly program specifically, on a 7-point scale (1=Not at all satisfied/likely; 7=Extremely satisfied/likely).



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18 years or older
  • Employed at least part-time
  • Self-report stress at work
  • English speaking
  • Access to a computer with high-speed internet connection, audio-video capability and an active email account

Exclusion Criteria:

  • High level of self-reported grief
  • High level of self-reported depression (PHQ-2)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02346591


Locations
Layout table for location information
United States, Oregon
Oregon Center for Applied Science
Eugene, Oregon, United States, 97401
Sponsors and Collaborators
Oregon Center for Applied Science, Inc.
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Amy Birney, MPH, MCHES Oregon Center for Applied Science

Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Amy Birney, Research Scientist, Oregon Center for Applied Science, Inc.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02346591     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 102-2R
First Posted: January 27, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 27, 2015
Last Verified: January 2015

Keywords provided by Amy Birney, Oregon Center for Applied Science, Inc.:
Positive psychology
Wellbeing
Stress reduction
Relaxation
Gratitude
Mobile app
Intervention
Altruism
Psychological well-being
Social well-being
Physical well-being
Workplace engagement