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The Effect of Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep on Emotional Memory and Affective Reactivity

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03767426
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : December 6, 2018
Last Update Posted : July 30, 2021
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Boston College
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Robert Stickgold, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Brief Summary:
To further understand the impact of acute sleep deprivation and recovery sleep on the processing of emotional information the investigators will address and attempt to answer three questions, (i) how both undisturbed sleep and sleep deprivation affect the processing and retrieval of emotional information, (ii) what neural and psychophysiological mechanisms are associated with these behavioral effects, and (iii) to explore the ability of recovery sleep to reverse the effects of sleep deprivation. Together, these studies will provide a greater breadth and depth of knowledge concerning sleep's role in emotion processing and regulation. Given the growing societal tendency to view sleep as unproductive-foregoing it to lengthen work days and increase social opportunities- such knowledge would be of practical importance for understanding the role of sleep in healthy emotional functioning, particular for individuals experiencing periods of increased stress and emotional distress (e.g., new parents, hospital staff, or combat troops).

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Sleep Deprivation Sleep Behavioral: Sleep Deprivation Behavioral: Daytime nap Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Goal 1: How does sleep deprivation impact emotion perception and memory processing? The investigators are interested in how an acute loss of sleep impairs our ability to properly perceive, consolidate, and retrieve emotional information. There has been research on the effect of sleep deprivation on broad areas of cognition, such as attention, working memory, and reasoning ability, but the impact of sleep loss on emotional processing and regulation remains largely unexplored. The investigators aim to characterize how sleep deprivation compared to undisturbed sleep affects the ability to accurately perceive emotion, how it alters the intensity with which emotions are perceived, and the effect that these changes have on the subsequent consolidation and memory retrieval for emotional compared to neutral information.

Goal 2: How are these changes reflected in the neural signal and with psychophysiological measures? The investigators will utilize fMRI and measures of autonomic reactivity (heart rate and skin conductance) to characterize the neural and psychophysiological mechanisms underlying these behavioral changes following sleep deprivation compared to a normal night of sleep. This will allow us to pinpoint the brain regions involved in changes following sleep deprivation, and associate these changes with effects on downstream physiological responses.

Goal 3: Can a nap after sleep deprivation restore normal processing of emotional memory and rescue the neural and autonomic markers of sleep deprivation? The investigators are interested in determining if a brief period of recovery sleep is enough to combat the behavioral, neural, and autonomic effects of acute sleep loss, thus a portion of the sleep-deprived participants will be given a 2-hour nap opportunity to quantify its restorative effects. Such information would form the foundation for future research extending and translating these findings into effective sleep-based interventions for healthy and clinical populations alike.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 100 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Independent group comparison
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: The Effect of Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep on Emotional Memory and Affective Reactivity
Actual Study Start Date : March 1, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : September 1, 2022
Estimated Study Completion Date : September 1, 2023

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Memory

Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: Overnight sleep
Subjects are permitted a night of polysomnograph-recorded sleep before participating in training and testing sessions the next day
Active Comparator: Sleep deprivation
Subjects sleep deprived before participating in training and testing sessions the next day
Behavioral: Sleep Deprivation
Subjects are sleep deprived for an entire night

Experimental: Daytime Nap
Subjects are trained and then retested after a daytime nap
Behavioral: Sleep Deprivation
Subjects are sleep deprived for an entire night

Behavioral: Daytime nap
After a night of sleep deprivation, participants will be given a 2 hour nap opportunity




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Morphed Face Accuracy and Intensity [ Time Frame: 1-24 hours ]
    Participants are asked to identify and rate emotional intensity of ambiguous emotional faces (happy, sad, angry) that have been morphed with neutral faces. Scores for each emotional domain will be calculated as (i) accuracy score (number of faces correctly identified over total faces seen), and (ii) average emotional intensity rating. Task will be completed at baseline, post-sleep/sleep deprivation, and post-nap/no nap, and within-subject comparisons will determine how interventions impact emotional perception.

  2. Emotional Memory Tradeoff Memory Score [ Time Frame: 12-24 hours ]
    Following sleep or sleep deprivation, participants will complete emotional memory tradeoff recognition task at two time points, separated by a nap or wakefulness. Corrected hit rate will be calculated for negative and neutral scene components as the percentage of correctly identified "old" objects/backgrounds minus percentage of false alarms ("new" pictures marked as "old")

  3. Psychomotor vigilance task lapse rate [ Time Frame: 1-24 hours ]
    The absolute number of trials in a 5-min test period on which the participant fails to responds with 500ms is calculated as the lapse rate.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. fMRI measured neural reactivity (blood oxygen-level dependent signal) [ Time Frame: 12-24 hours ]
    Following sleep or sleep deprivation, regions of interest include amygdala reactivity and connectivity between the amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in response to negative and neutral stimuli.

  2. Heart Rate Reactivity (Beats per minute) [ Time Frame: 12-24 hours ]
    The change in heart rate beats per minute in response to negative and neutral stimuli after sleep or sleep deprivation.

  3. Skin Conductance Reactivity (micro Siemens) [ Time Frame: 12-24 hours ]
    The change in electrodermal activity in response to negative and neutral stimuli after sleep or sleep deprivation.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • willing and able to follow the protocol
  • willing and able to meet inclusion criteria for fMRI scanning
  • willing to refrain from alcohol and recreational drugs for the duration of the protocol
  • normal or corrected to normal vision is required

Exclusion Criteria:

  • self-reported sleep disturbances
  • left-handedness or ambidexterity
  • a history of mental illness or neurological disorder
  • the use of any drugs that could affect either sleep or cognitive functioning (e.g., sleeping pills or antidepressants)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03767426


Locations
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United States, Massachusetts
Robert Stickgold
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02215
Sponsors and Collaborators
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston College
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Robert Stickgold, PhD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
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Responsible Party: Robert Stickgold, Professor of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03767426    
Other Study ID Numbers: TC-1
First Posted: December 6, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 30, 2021
Last Verified: July 2021

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Robert Stickgold, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center:
Emotion
Memory
Sleep
Sleep Deprivation
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Sleep Deprivation
Dyssomnias
Sleep Wake Disorders
Nervous System Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Mental Disorders