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Supporting Family Caregivers With Technology for Dementia Home Care (FamTechCare)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02483520
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : June 29, 2015
Results First Posted : November 13, 2020
Last Update Posted : November 13, 2020
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Kansas Medical Center

Brief Summary:

This clinical trial will test the FamTechCare intervention that uses multidisciplinary professional guidance based on in-home video monitoring to support family caregivers in managing challenging behaviors of persons with dementia (PWD). Families provide the majority of care for PWD at home. However the stress of caregiving is so significant that it increases caregiver morbidity and mortality. Stress is magnified by disruptive behaviors in PWD that frequently lead to nursing home placement. In-home video monitoring allows experts to assess behaviors of PWD and to identify antecedents, recommend specific interventions. FamTechCare uses new technology to link family caregivers to experts for guidance in managing disruptive behaviors, supporting continued care at home while reducing the negative effects of caregiving.

Caregiver-PWD dyads (N=88) will be randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Both groups will record behaviors during daily care for 3 months using a home monitoring unit. Notably, this new technology captures 3-5 minutes prior to the behavior, thus recording behavior triggers and precursors. Caregivers record care situations they select and upload videos to a secure site. The expert team will review intervention group videos weekly and will provide individualized feedback for improving care to caregivers in the home. The control group caregivers will receive a weekly phone call and advice from a nurse, but their recorded videos will be held for review and individualized feedback provided after 3 months.

Study aims are to use observation to assist caregivers in behavior management. Effects on disruptive behaviors and caregiver burden and other negative outcomes will be compared. Investigators will evaluate ease of use and satisfaction, cost-efficiency, and factors influencing likelihood of translation into practice. This is the first study to test new technology for direct observation and immediate feedback to empower families to manage PWD behaviors at home while reducing caregiver stress and morbidity. Technology links caregivers to individualized expert guidance, acknowledging the importance and burden of their role. This study addresses NIH missions and the 2012 National Plan to Address Alzheimer's disease goals, integrating strategies to promote adoption and use of aging services technologies in interventions that will reduce negative caregiver outcomes, a growing public health problem.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Dementia Behavioral: FamTechCare Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

This clinical trial will test the FamTechCare intervention that uses multidisciplinary professional guidance based on in-home video monitoring to support family caregivers in managing behaviors of persons with dementia (PWD). Families provide the majority of care for PWD at home. However the stress of caregiving is so significant that it increases caregiver morbidity and mortality. Stress is magnified by disruptive behaviors that frequently lead to nursing home placement. In-home video monitoring allows experts to assess behaviors of PWD and to identify antecedents, recommend specific interventions, and subsequently evaluate caregiver outcomes. FamTechCare uses new technology to link family caregivers to experts for guidance in managing disruptive behaviors, supporting continued care at home while reducing the negative effects of caregiving.

Caregiver-PWD dyads (N=88) will be randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Both groups will record behaviors during daily care for 3 months using a home monitoring unit. Notably, this new technology captures 3-5 minutes prior to the behavior, thus recording behavior triggers and precursors. Intervention group videos will be auto-uploaded to a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) secure Internet site for weekly team review with in-home feedback to caregivers in behavior management. The time and attention equivalent control group will receive a weekly phone call from a nurse, but their recorded videos will be held for review and feedback after 3 months.

Study aims are to identify interventions, based on in-home observations, to assist caregivers in behavior management. Between-group effects on outcomes, including PWD disruptive behaviors and caregiver burden and other negative outcomes will be compared using linear mixed modeling. Ease of use and satisfaction, cost-efficiency, and factors influencing likelihood of translation into practice will be evaluated. This tests new technology for direct observation and immediate feedback to empower families to manage PWD behaviors at home while reducing caregiver stress and morbidity. Technology links caregivers to individualized expert guidance, acknowledging the importance and burden of their role. This study addresses NIH missions and the 2012 National Plan to Address Alzheimer's disease goals, integrating strategies to promote adoption and use of aging services technologies in interventions that will reduce negative caregiver outcomes, a growing public health problem.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 189 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Supporting Family Caregivers With Technology for Dementia Home Care
Study Start Date : March 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : January 31, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : January 31, 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Caregivers Dementia

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Intervention FamTechCare
This group will submit videos and receive weekly feed back after review by dementia care experts for managing challenging care situations. The intervention is weekly individualized feedback based on video data (FamTechCare).
Behavioral: FamTechCare
Caregiver submitted videos of challenging care situations are uploaded to a HIPAA secure site and reviewed by dementia care experts who provide feedback for improving care.

Placebo Comparator: Control and Delayed FamTechCare
This group will submit videos and will receive weekly feedback from a nurse based on their verbal communication until the end of their participation. At the end of the study, they will receive feedback based on submitted videos from dementia care experts (delayed FamTechCare).
Behavioral: FamTechCare
Caregiver submitted videos of challenging care situations are uploaded to a HIPAA secure site and reviewed by dementia care experts who provide feedback for improving care.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Behaviorally Coded Challenging Behaviors (Agitated, Disruptive, Resistive) [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
    Behavioral coding of videos for agitated, disruptive, or resistive behaviors will be used to identity changes in behavior before and after the intervention.

  2. Change in Caregiver Stress - Reaction to Memory Symptoms (Bother) [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregiver reaction to behavioral symptoms of the Person with Dementia (PWD) was measured by the Revised Memory and Problem Behavior Checklist (RMPBC). The RMPBC contains 24 items, each with two parts. Each item represents a behavior; if the behavior has been exhibited by the PWD in the past week, the caregiver reports the behavior as present. If the behavior is present, the caregiver then reports "how much it bothered you?" on a five-point Likert scale (0 = not at all; 4 = extremely). If the behavior was not present, no "bother" score is provided, and the item is scored 0. The items are summed for a total score (range = 0-96) and for three subscales representing bother due to memory-related problems (range = 0-28), depressive symptoms (range = 0-36), and disruptive symptoms (range = 0-32). A higher score indicates a greater negative reaction to behaviors.

  3. Change in Caregiver Stress - Reaction to Depressive Symptoms (Bother) [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregiver reaction to behavioral symptoms of the person with dementia (PWD) was measured by the Revised Memory and Problem Behavior Checklist (RMPBC). The RMPBC contains 24 items, each with two parts. Each item represents a behavior; if the behavior has been exhibited by the PWD in the past week, the caregiver reports the behavior as present. If the behavior is present, the caregiver then reports "how much it bothered you?" on a five-point Likert scale (0 = not at all; 4 = extremely). If the behavior was not present, no "bother" score is provided, and the item is scored 0. The items are summed for a total score (range = 0-96) and for three subscales representing bother due to memory-related problems (range = 0-28), depressive symptoms (range = 0-36), and disruptive symptoms (range = 0-32). A higher score indicates a greater negative reaction to behaviors.

  4. Change in Caregiver Stress - Desire to Instituionalize [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Desire to institutionalize was measured using a modified Desire to Institutionalize Scale. The modified Desire to Institutionalize Scale contains six items rated as dichotomous yes or no (1 = yes; 0 = no). A higher score indicates a greater desire to institutionalize (range = 0-6). Internal consistency for the Desire to Institutionalize scale is adequate (α = .69-.77) and has shown adequate construct validity through factor analysis.

  5. Change in Caregiver Stress - Biological Sensor Data [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Biological stress reactions measured by sensor

  6. Change in Caregiver Burden [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregiver burden was measured using the Modified Zarit Burden Scale that contains 12 items with a 5-point Likert scale (0 = never; 4 = nearly always) adapted from the 22-item Zarit Burden Interview. A higher score indicates greater caregiver burden (range = 0-48). The Modified Zarit Burden Scale has shown adequate internal consistency (α = .88) and excellent concurrent validity (r = .92- .97) with the full Zarit Burden Interview.

  7. Change in Caregiver Health and Wellbeing - Depression [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregiver depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D). The CES-D contains 20 items with a 4-point Likert scale ranging from 0 = rarely or none of the time (i.e., less than 1 day in past week) to 3 = most or all of the time (i.e., 5-7 days in past week). A higher score indicates greater depression (range = 0-60). The CES-D shows adequate internal consistency (α = .84-.90), moderate convergent validity with other depression scales (r = .44-.75), and has been shown to effectively measure change in psychoeducational interventions for dementia caregivers.

  8. Change in Caregiver Health and Wellbeing - Competence [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregiver sense of competence was measured using the Short Sense of Competence Questionnaire (SSCQ).37 The SSCQ contains seven negatively worded items (e.g., "I feel strained in my interaction with..."). Each item is rated on a five-point Likert scale and dichotomized to agree (i.e., agree very strongly, agree, neutral) or disagree (i.e., disagree or strongly disagree). The items where the caregiver disagreed are summed for the total score. A higher score indicates a higher sense of competence (range = 0-7). The SSCQ shows adequate internal consistency (α = .76) and concurrent validity with the original Sense of Competence Questionnaire (r = .88).

  9. Change in Caregiver Health and Wellbeing - Sleep Disturbance [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregiver sleep disturbance was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The PSQI contains 19 items with a 4-point Likert scale across seven domains: sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep ef- ficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medications, and daytime dysfunction. A higher global score indicates worse sleep quality (range = 0-21). The PSQI shows adequate internal consistency (α = .83) and adequate validity in differentiating patients with and without sleep disorders.

  10. Change in Caregiver Health and Wellbeing - Medication Use [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregivers taking PRN anxiolytics, hypnotics, or antipsychotic medication.

  11. Change in Caregiver Health and Wellbeing - Confidence in Managing BPSD [ Time Frame: Baseline, 3 months ]
    Caregivers reported their three priority care challenges at baseline using the Caregiver Target Problems Questionnaire (Teri, McCurry, Logsdon, & Gibbons, 2005). The Caregiver Target Problems Questionnaire was adapted and used to identify caregiver priority care challenges for frequency, severity, and confidence at baseline and 3-months (Teri et al., 2005). Prior to group allocation, caregivers identified three priority care challenges and rated them on 5-point Likert scales: frequency of the challenge (0 = None to 4 = Daily or more often), severity of the challenge (0 = Trivial to 4 = Severe), and confidence in managing the challenge (0 = Unable to manage to 4 = Very confident). At the end of the 3-month trial, caregivers repeated their ratings of the baseline care challenges. Improvement was indicated increase in confidence from baseline to 3-months.

  12. Change in Caregiver Health and Wellbeing - Confidence in Managing Disease Expectations [ Time Frame: Baseline, 3 months ]
    Caregivers reported their three priority care challenges at baseline using the Caregiver Target Problems Questionnaire (Teri, McCurry, Logsdon, & Gibbons, 2005). The Caregiver Target Problems Questionnaire was adapted and used to identify caregiver priority care challenges for frequency, severity, and confidence at baseline and 3-months (Teri et al., 2005). Prior to group allocation, caregivers identified three priority care challenges and rated them on 5-point Likert scales: frequency of the challenge (0 = None to 4 = Daily or more often), severity of the challenge (0 = Trivial to 4 = Severe), and confidence in managing the challenge (0 = Unable to manage to 4 = Very confident). At the end of the 3-month trial, caregivers repeated their ratings of the baseline care challenges. Improvement was indicated increase in confidence from baseline to 3-months.

  13. Change in Caregiver Health and Wellbeing - Confidence in Managing ADLs (Activities of Daily Living) [ Time Frame: Baseline, 3 months ]
    Caregivers reported their three priority care challenges at baseline using the Caregiver Target Problems Questionnaire (Teri, McCurry, Logsdon, & Gibbons, 2005). The Caregiver Target Problems Questionnaire was adapted and used to identify caregiver priority care challenges for frequency, severity, and confidence at baseline and 3-months (Teri et al., 2005). Prior to group allocation, caregivers identified three priority care challenges and rated them on 5-point Likert scales: frequency of the challenge (0 = None to 4 = Daily or more often), severity of the challenge (0 = Trivial to 4 = Severe), and confidence in managing the challenge (0 = Unable to manage to 4 = Very confident). At the end of the 3-month trial, caregivers repeated their ratings of the baseline care challenges. Improvement was indicated increase in confidence from baseline to 3-months.

  14. Change in Caregiver Reported Challenging Behaviors - Reaction to Disruptive Symptoms (Bother) [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Caregiver reaction to behavioral symptoms of the PLWD was measured by the Revised Memory and Problem Behavior Checklist (RMPBC). The RMPBC contains 24 items, each with two parts. Each item represents a behavior; if the behavior has been exhibited by the PLWD in the past week, the caregiver reports the behavior as present. If the behavior is present, the caregiver then reports "how much it bothered you?" on a five-point Likert scale (0 = not at all; 4 = extremely). If the behavior was not present, no "bother" score is provided, and the item is scored 0. The items are summed for a total score (range = 0-96) and for three subscales representing bother due to memory-related problems (range = 0-28), depressive symptoms (range = 0-36), and disruptive symptoms (range = 0-32). A higher score indicates a greater negative reaction to behaviors.

  15. Change in Caregiver Reported Challenging Behaviors - Frequency of Disruptive Behaviors [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 month, 3 months ]
    Frequency of disruptive behaviors measured by the Revised Memory and Problem Behavior Checklist (RMPBC). The RMPBC contains 24 items. Each item represents a behavior; if the behavior has been exhibited by the person with dementia in the past week, the caregiver reports the behavior as present. There are 8 disruptive behaviors questions. Range is 0-8. A decrease in disruptive behaviors is an improvement.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Cost for FamTechCare Treatment Compared to Control Group [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
    Process-based costing for the FamTechCare group compared to the control group. Costs reflect the total cost for the program per dyad per week.

  2. Cost for FamTechCare Treatment Compared to Control Group - ICER [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
    Incremental Cost-effectiveness Ratio (ICER) for Significant Primary Outcomes: Depression and Competence. Costs reflect the total cost for the program per dyad per week to achieve effect in each outcome.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Person caring for someone with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or other dementia at home.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Exclusion criteria include Huntington's disease, alcohol-related dementia, schizophrenia, manic-depressive disorder, deafness, and mental retardation.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02483520


Locations
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United States, Iowa
University of Iowa College of Nursing
Iowa City, Iowa, United States, 52242
United States, Kansas
University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City, Kansas, United States, 66160
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Kansas Medical Center
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Kristine N Williams, RN, PhD University of Kansas Medical Center
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by University of Kansas Medical Center:
Informed Consent Form  [PDF] May 22, 2018

Publications of Results:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: University of Kansas Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02483520    
Other Study ID Numbers: STUDY00000053
R01NR014737 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: June 29, 2015    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: November 13, 2020
Last Update Posted: November 13, 2020
Last Verified: October 2020

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by University of Kansas Medical Center:
Family caregiver
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Dementia
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Neurocognitive Disorders
Mental Disorders