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Estrogen in the Prevention of Adhesion Reformation

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03620929
Recruitment Status : Enrolling by invitation
First Posted : August 8, 2018
Last Update Posted : September 13, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Yang Ling Ling, Fu Xing Hospital, Capital Medical University

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE August 5, 2018
First Posted Date  ICMJE August 8, 2018
Last Update Posted Date September 13, 2018
Actual Study Start Date  ICMJE August 13, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date August 1, 2020   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: August 5, 2018)
AFS score [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
The severity and extent of intrauterine adhesions will be scored according to a classification system recommended by the American Fertility Society (AFS) (1988 version).
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Same as current
Change History Complete list of historical versions of study NCT03620929 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Estrogen in the Prevention of Adhesion Reformation
Official Title  ICMJE The Effect of Estrogen in the Prevention of Adhesion Reformation After Hysteroscopic Adhesiolysis
Brief Summary

Asherman syndrome, which occurs after trauma to the basalis layer of the endometrium.It seems that the role of postoperative estrogen therapy in the prevention of recurrence of IU adhesions is still controversial. To investigate if estrogen therapy can prevent adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis.

After the completion of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis, recruited patients will be randomized to one of the two treatment groups by computer-generated numbers: having estrogen after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis three months, all patients in this group will be treated with hormone therapy for 3 cycles; each cycle consists of estradiol 4mg per day for 21 days with addition of progestogen in the form of dydrogesterone 10mg per day for the last 7 days; and the control group without estrogen treatment. A second-look hysteroscopy and ultrasound assessment of the endometrium will be carried out 4 weeks after the surgery, and again at 8 weeks after the surgery.

Detailed Description

Background information Asherman syndrome, which occurs after trauma to the basalis layer of the endometrium generally after endometrial curettage, may manifest as hypomenorrhea, amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, infertility or recurrent miscarriage.

At present, hysteroscopic adhesiolysis is the recommended standard diagnostic method and treatment for IUA. Recurrence of uterine cavity adhesion post-operatively is frequently reported, especially in severe IUA patients. A number of strategies have been proposed to prevent recurrence of adhesion reformation, including the use of post-operative estrogen. However, it is still not known if estrogen therapy is indeed necessary or effective. In a prospective randomized study which evaluated the efficacy of estrogen in preventing IUA following hysteroscopic septal resection, it was found that estrogen did not have any benefit in reducing adhesion formation. In another RCT study on women with Asherman syndrome, there did not appear to be any difference in the recurrence of IUA and pregnancy rate between those who did or did not receive adjuvant hormonal medication. On the other hand, large doses of estrogen may result in endometrium fibrosis and inhibited endometrium receptivity.

It seems that the role of postoperative estrogen therapy in the prevention of recurrence of IU adhesions is still controversial. In this prospective, randomized, controlled study, we wish to determine if estrogen therapy is of benefit in preventing adhesion reformation after IUA for Asherman syndrome. As the effect may be different for subjects with different degrees of IUA, we propose to stratify the subjects into those with mild and severe IUAs.

Objectives To investigate if estrogen therapy can prevent adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis.

Patients The patients will be recruited from the hysteroscopy Center of the Fuxing Hospital, Beijing, China. Before the surgery all patients with suspected Asherman syndrome will undergo preoperative evaluations, including a detailed history of the menstrual pattern, any previous intrauterine surgery, reproductive history, as well as trans-vaginal ultrasonography. The severity and extent of intrauterine adhesions will be scored according to a classification system recommended by the American Fertility Society (AFS) (1988 version). The inclusion criteria include [1] women aged 18-40 years; written consent obtained; and agreement to have second-look hysteroscopy. The exclusion criteria included:1 has received estrogen therapy within 3 month of enrolment. 2 suffers from leiomyoma, endometrial polyps, cancer, or polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). 3.History of genital tuberculosis; and 4. contraindications for estrogen therapy.

Study Design After the completion of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis, recruited patients will be randomized to one of the two treatment groups by computer-generated numbers: having estrogen after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis three months, all patients in this group will be treated with hormone therapy for 3 cycles; each cycle consists of estradiol 4mg per day for 21 days with addition of progestogen in the form of dydrogesterone 10mg per day for the last 7 days; and the control group without estrogen treatment. A second-look hysteroscopy and ultrasound assessment of the endometrium will be carried out 4 weeks after the surgery, and again at 8 weeks after the surgery.

Power Calculation On the basis of the results of the two published retrospective cohort studies comparing the balloon and hormone therapy group (control group) in the prevention of adhesion reformation, in the mild intrauterine adhesion (AFS score 1~6), we estimate that the adhesion reformation rate the hormone therapy group is 10% and control group is 30%. Accepting a type 1 error (a) of 0.05, and a type 2 error (b) of 0.10, the number of subjects in each arm of the randomized, controlled trial would be 39. Assuming that the dropout rate is 20%, the total number of subject to be recruited would be 49 in each arm. In the severe intrauterine adhesion (AFS score7~12) group, we estimate that the adhesion reformation rate the hormone therapy group is 25% and control group is 50%. Accepting a type 1 error (a) of 0.05, and a type 2 error (b) of 0.10, the number of subjects in each arm of the randomized, controlled trial would be 37. Assuming that the dropout rate is 20%, the total number of subject to be recruited would be 44 in each arm.

Procedure Surgical procedure The surgery will be carried out by one of three experienced hysteroscopic surgeons with the use of a 4.5-mm rigid hysteroscope (Olympus) with 5% saline perfusion under 100 mm Hg pressure. The primary procedure will be performed under general anesthesia in a day surgery unit. Ultrasonographic guidance will be routinely used. Once the extent and severity of uterine adhesion has been assessed, the adhesions will be divided with the use of mono-polar instrument until normal uterine anatomy is achieved.

Postoperative treatments All subjects will be treated with oral antibiotic for 5 days. In all cases hormone therapy will be started from the day of operation, consisting of estradiol valerate at a dose of 4mg/d for 21 days, with the addition of dydrogesterone at a dose of 10 mg/d for the last 7 days of the estrogen therapy. After the withdrawal bleed, the hormone therapy will be repeated for another cycle. Second-look hysteroscopy will be carried out in the early proliferative phase, 4 weeks after the initial operation; a third-look hysteroscopy will be carried out 8 weeks after the initial operation. After assessment of the extent and severity of any reformed adhesion, hysteroscopic adhesiolysis will be carried out at the time of the second-look or third-look procedure, if adhesion had recurred. The surgeon who later performs the second-look and third-look hysteroscopy will be blinded to the randomization. All patients will be treated with hormone therapy for a total of three cycles.

Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Phase 4
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Condition  ICMJE Asherman Syndrome
Intervention  ICMJE Drug: Estradiol Valerate
In all cases hormone therapy will be started from the day of operation, consisting of estradiol valerate at a dose of 4mg/d for 21 days, with the addition of dydrogesterone at a dose of 10 mg/d for the last 7 days of the estrogen therapy. After the withdrawal bleed, the hormone therapy will be repeated for another cycle. Second-look hysteroscopy will be carried out in the early proliferative phase, 4 weeks after the initial operation; a third-look hysteroscopy will be carried out 8 weeks after the initial operation. After assessment of the extent and severity of any reformed adhesion, hysteroscopic adhesiolysis will be carried out at the time of the second-look or third-look procedure, if adhesion had recurred.
Other Name: dydrogesterone
Study Arms  ICMJE
  • Experimental: Experiment group
    Having estrogen(Estradiol Valerate) after hysteroscopic adhesiolysis three months, all patients in this group will be treated with hormone therapy for 3 cycles; each cycle consists of estradiol 4mg per day for 21 days with addition of progestogen in the form of dydrogesterone 10mg per day for the last 7 days;
    Intervention: Drug: Estradiol Valerate
  • No Intervention: Control group
    Control group without estrogen treatment. A second-look hysteroscopy and ultrasound assessment of the endometrium will be carried out 4 weeks after the surgery, and again at 8 weeks after the surgery.
Publications *

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Enrolling by invitation
Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: August 5, 2018)
186
Original Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE Same as current
Estimated Study Completion Date  ICMJE December 1, 2020
Estimated Primary Completion Date August 1, 2020   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE

Inclusion Criteria:

patients with suspected Asherman syndrome

Exclusion Criteria:

  • 1 has received estrogen therapy within 3 month of enrolment. 2 suffers from leiomyoma, endometrial polyps, cancer, or polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). 3.History of genital tuberculosis; and 4. contraindications for estrogen therapy.
Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: Female
Ages  ICMJE 18 Years to 40 Years   (Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE No
Contacts  ICMJE Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE China
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT03620929
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE 2018FXHEC-KY025
Has Data Monitoring Committee No
U.S. FDA-regulated Product
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Responsible Party Yang Ling Ling, Fu Xing Hospital, Capital Medical University
Study Sponsor  ICMJE Fu Xing Hospital, Capital Medical University
Collaborators  ICMJE Not Provided
Investigators  ICMJE Not Provided
PRS Account Fu Xing Hospital, Capital Medical University
Verification Date September 2018

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP