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Trial record 29 of 206 for:    Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | "Mental Health"

The Influence of Mindfulness on the Link Between Consumer Culture Values and Well-being

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03079154
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : March 14, 2017
Last Update Posted : March 15, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Sussex Mindfulness Centre
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Sussex

March 2, 2017
March 14, 2017
March 15, 2017
March 2017
June 16, 2017   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in Mental health [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    We are using a mental health assessment (DASS-21) widely used in clinical and non-clinical populations which assess symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in Subjective well-being [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This measure consists of an assessment of life satisfaction, and a brief measure of the frequency of positive and negative affective experiences as used in (Dittmar and Kapur, 2011)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in consumption-based coping [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by beingcollected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This is a newly developed scale which measures the extent to which individuals use buying material goods as a strategy to cope with stress (Wright et. al, 2016)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in body esteem [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    We are using a well-established scale of body esteem (Mendelson et al., 2001), which assesses general appearance evaluation, evaluation of one's weight, and perceived evaluation by others
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in material esteem [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This is a newly developed scale that assesses individuals' esteem in terms of the material goods they own (Dittmar et al., 2016)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in eating behaviour [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    We will use a shortened form of the Dutch Eating Behaviour Scale (Van Strien et al., 1986) which measures restraint, emotional, and external eating
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in excessive buying [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This scale measures compulsive buying tendencies, such as having urges to buy or feeling out of control of one's shopping behaviour (Dittmar et al., 2007)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in emotional regulation [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This scale, developed by Bjureberg (2016), assessing difficulties that people experience in dealing with, and regulating strong emotions
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in Mental health [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    We are using a mental health assessment (DASS-21) widely used in clinical and non-clinical populations which assess symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in Subjective well-being [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This measure consists of an assessment of life satisfaction, and a brief measure of the frequency of positive and negative affective experiences as used in (Dittmar and Kapur, 2011)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in consumption-based coping [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This is a newly developed scale which measures the extent to which individuals use buying material goods as a strategy to cope with stress (Wright et. al, 2016)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in body esteem [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    We are using a well-established scale of body esteem (Mendelson et al., 2001), which assesses general appearance evaluation, evaluation of one's weight, and perceived evaluation by others
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in material esteem [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This is a newly developed scale that assesses individuals' esteem in terms of the material goods they own (Dittmar et al., 2016)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in eating behaviour [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    We will use a shortened form of the Dutch Eating Behaviour Scale (Van Strien et al., 1986) which measures restraint, emotional, and external eating
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in excessive buying [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This scale measures compulsive buying tendencies, such as having urges to buy or feeling out of control of one's shopping behaviour (Dittmar et al., 2007)
  • Indicators of psychological well-being: Change in emotional regulation [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    This scale, developed by Bjureberg (2016), assessing difficulties that people experience in dealing with, and regulating strong emotions
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT03079154 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Consumer culture values (materialistic and appearance-focused personal values) [ Time Frame: This self-report measure will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and immediately after exposure to consumer culture stimuli in phase 4 of the research ]
    This questionnaire measures motives and internalisation with respect to materialistic and appearance-focused values (Easterbrook et al., 2014)
  • Behavioural measure related to consumer culture: eating [ Time Frame: This behavioural measure will be collected immediately after exposure to consumer culture stimuli in phase 4 of the research ]
    Research participants will be offered a plate of snack foods and told they are can eat as many of them as they would like
  • Behavioural measure related to consumer culture: buying consumer goods online [ Time Frame: This behavioural measure will be collected immediately after exposure to consumer culture stimuli in phase 4 of the research ]
    Respondents will be invited to use an online retail website for discounted goods to make purchases if they so wish
Same as current
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in core self beliefs [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Core self beliefs (Fowler et al, 2006) measure the habitual negative and positive beliefs people hold about their self
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-discrepancies [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-discrepancies (Dittmar et al., 1998) refer to perceived gaps between how a person would ideally like to be and how they actually are
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-compassion [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-compassion (Neff, 2016 short form) refers to having a kind and empathic approach to oneself
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-concept clarity [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-concept clarity (Campbell et al., 2003) means that people have a clear and confident view of who and what they are like
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-construal [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-construal (Aron et al., 1992) assesses the extent to which a person sees themselves as an individual entity that is separate for others or connected with others
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in social comparison tendency [ Time Frame: The change in this self-report measure will be be measured by being collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Social comparison tendency (Gibbons & Buunk, 1999)
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in core self beliefs [ Time Frame: This self-report measures will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Core self beliefs (Fowler et al, 2006) measure the habitual negative and positive beliefs people hold about their self
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-discrepancies [ Time Frame: This self-report measures will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-discrepancies (Dittmar et al., 1998) refer to perceived gaps between how a person would ideally like to be and how they actually are
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-compassion [ Time Frame: This self-report measures will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-compassion (Neff, 2016 short form) refers to having a kind and empathic approach to oneself
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-concept clarity [ Time Frame: This self-report measures will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-concept clarity (Campbell et al., 2003) means that people have a clear and confident view of who and what they are like
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in self-construal [ Time Frame: This self-report measures will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Self-construal (Aron et al., 1992) assesses the extent to which a person sees themselves as an individual entity that is separate for others or connected with others
  • Self and self-related processes: Change in social comparison tendency [ Time Frame: This self-report measures will be collected five-six weeks before the intervention, and immediately after the intervention ]
    Social comparison tendency (Gibbons & Buunk, 1999)
 
The Influence of Mindfulness on the Link Between Consumer Culture Values and Well-being
A Pilot RCT Intervention to Test the Impact of High and Low-intensity Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) on Self, Values, and Well-being
The study is a three-arm intervention, where students are randomly assigned to one of three conditions: Teacher-led group-based MBCT, Self-guided MBCT using an audio book, or 'wait list' control. Pre-intervention, respondents complete a questionnaire assessing self, values, psychological processes related to self, and well-being. Post-intervention, respondents complete the same questionnaire, and then take part in a laboratory-based study which assesses behaviours related to the variables measured in the questionnaires. We are aiming for a sample size of 180 students at Sussex, 60 in each intervention arm.

Substantive evidence shows that mindfulness training improves mental health and general well-being (see meta-analyses by Cavanagh, Strauss, and colleagues). A significant factor that reduces well-being is the internalisation of two core consumer culture values: a materialistic value orientation (MVO) and body perfect ideals (see meta-analyses by Dittmar and colleagues for MVO, and Grabe et al, Barlett et al. for idealised media models). Thus, mindfulness may act as a buffer against the negative impact of consumer culture ideals, consistent with value circumplex models which place materialistic and appearance-focused values at the self-enhancement end, opposite to self-transcendence values, such as caring for self and others and community engagement.

Self-transcendence values lead to psychological need satisfaction, whereas consumer culture values undermine such satisfaction (Self-Determination Theory).

Three novel questions are examined: (1) Is change in self-related values and psychological processes significant for the beneficial consequences of mindfulness for well-being? (2) Does mindfulness training reduce consumer culture values and associated harmful behaviours, such as disordered eating and excessive buying? (3) Do high and low intensity mindfulness interventions differ in impact?

The project involves collaboration with Kate Cavanagh in Psychology and the Co-Directors of the Sussex Centre for Mindfulness Clara Strauss and Robert Marx. It consists of: 1. qualitative interviews with experienced mindfulness teachers, 2. a multi-phase student intervention study, and 3. an exposure experiment with the same student sample.

Study 1: INTERVIEWS WITH MINDFULNESS TEACHERS (n=12) Semi-structured interviews with teachers (recruited through the UK Network of Mindfulness Teacher Training Organisations) will examine their views on the psychological processes significant in individuals' mental health improvement, focusing on processes related to values and self. Interviews will be audio-taped.

Study 2: INTERVENTION WITH STUDENTS (n=165-180) Phase 1: Online survey to collect baseline measures on all variables of interest, using established scales Trait mindfulness (Gu et al, 2016); Consumer Culture Values (Easterbrook et al., 2014); Core Self Beliefs (Fowler et al, 2006); Self-Discrepancies (Dittmar et al., 1996; Self-compassion (Neff, 2016); Self-esteem (Robins et al., 2001; Self-objectification (Lindner & Tantleff-Dunn, in press); Self-worth (Crocker et al., 2003); Self-concept clarity (Campbell et al., 2003); Self-construal (individualist vs. relational) (Aron et al., 1992); Social comparison tendency (Gibbons & Buunk, 1999); Consumer self-confidence, author, date); Mental health assessment (DASS-21); Subjective well-being (Dittmar & Kapur, 2001); Body esteem (Mendelson et al., 2001); Material esteem (Dittmar et al., 2016); Eating Behaviour (Van Strien et al., 1986, shortened); Excessive Buying (Dittmar et al., 2007); Emotion regulation (Bjureberg, 2016); Consumption-based coping (Wright et al., 2016)

Phase 2: Intervention (randomised control trial)

  • 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive group therapy course guided by (non-NHS) mindfulness teachers (high intensity)
  • Self-guided MBCT training using a published audio book and CDs (low intensity)
  • 'Waiting list' (control; respondents are offered the book after the study)

Phase 3: On-line survey (same as Phase 1) Study 3: IMPACT OF EXPOSURE TO CONSUMER CULTURE STIMULI (n=165-180) Using a 3 (mindfulness intervention condition) x 4 (CC stimuli: materialistic, appearance, combination, control) design, respondents view a film excerpt that contains an ad break (containing CC stimuli, approved in ER/HMC28/2), and then complete measures of actual eating (respondents will be offered food as a reward) and buying behaviour (approved in ER/RLJ/1), as well as selected measures used in Phases 1 and 3.

Studies 2 and 3 include 3 ug and 3 masters research projects.

Interventional
Not Applicable
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Other
Mental Health and General Well-being
  • Other: Teacher-led MBCT course
    9 x 2 hour group sessions following national guidelines for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy
    Other Name: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (high intensity)
  • Other: Self-guided MBCT course
    9 weeks of self-guided mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, following an audiobook covering the same material and exercises as the teacher-led intervention
    Other Name: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (low intensity)
  • Experimental: Teacher-led MBCT course
    Eight-session mindfulness-based cognitive therapy course, including an initial orientation session, led by a qualified mindfulness teacher working with the Sussex Mindfulness Centre, a part of the NHS Sussex Partnership Mental Health Trust.
    Intervention: Other: Teacher-led MBCT course
  • Active Comparator: Self-guided MBCT course
    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy course, after an initial information session, which is self-guided using the audiobook Mindfulness: A practical guide to finding peace in a frantic world by Mark Williams and Danny Penman (2011). It consists of eight substantive chapters that map on to the eight-session MBCT course taught by teachers to groups of students. Students will be asked to work through one chapter a week, thus matching the pace of the teacher-led intervention.
    Intervention: Other: Self-guided MBCT course
  • No Intervention: Wait list control
    Students in the wait list (control) arm do not receive any intervention for the same length of time as the experimental and active comparator arms of the intervention are taking place. Students are invited to complete the self-guided MBCT course after the end of the research project.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Not yet recruiting
180
Same as current
September 28, 2017
June 16, 2017   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

Student at the University of Sussex

Exclusion Criteria:

Having experienced a significant life event (e.g., bereavement) in the six months proceeding the study Suffering from a mental health condition at clinical levels Having prior time commitments that prevent the respondents from taking parts in all phases of the study

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Yes
Contact: Helga Dittmar, DPhil +441273606755 ext 8070 h.e.dittmar@sussex.ac.uk
Contact: Clara Strauss, DPhil +441273606755 c.y.strauss@sussex.ac.uk
Not Provided
 
 
NCT03079154
ER/HELGAD/10
No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Plan to Share IPD: No
University of Sussex
University of Sussex
Sussex Mindfulness Centre
Principal Investigator: Helga Dittmar, DPhil University of Sussex
University of Sussex
March 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP