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suPERficial Slow-flow Vascular malFORMations Treated With sirolimUS (PERFORMUS)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02509468
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : July 28, 2015
Last Update Posted : September 27, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University Hospital, Tours

July 15, 2015
July 28, 2015
September 27, 2018
September 30, 2015
March 2019   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Change of volume of the Vascular Malformation [ Time Frame: at baseline, at date of switch from the observational period to the sirolimus period (between 4 and 8 month) and at 12 months ]
Primary outcome will be based on the volume of the VMs on MRI. Three MRI will be performed: one at baseline (M0), one at the date of switch from the observational period to the sirolimus period (MS) and one at the end of follow-up (M12). Relative change of volume, standardized by the duration period, will define the outcome. Thus, for the observational period, the primary outcome is defined as {(VMS - V0)/V0}/(MS-M0) where V0 and VMS are the volumes assessed at baseline and month S, respectively, and (MS-M0) corresponds to the duration of the observational period. For the sirolimus period, the outcome is defined in the same way as {(V12 - VMS)/VMS}/(M12-MS), where V12 is the volume assessed at month 12 and (M12-MS) corresponds to the duration of the sirolimus period. Interpretation of the MRI will be centralized and performed by a radiologist blinded from physical assessment and from treatment period.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT02509468 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Efficacy of study treatment measured on digital photographs [ Time Frame: inclusion, switch from the observational period to the sirolimus period (between 4 and 8 month), switch+1month, 12 month ]
    Qualitative assessment of efficacy on digital photographs
  • Self assessment of efficacy of study treatment [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Patient self assessment or proxy (parents) self assessments using visual analogic scale (0-10):
    • Global treatment efficacy on a visual analogic scale (0-10)
    • Skin complications/symptoms (seepage, bleeding, skin tension, functional impairment)
    • Pain
    • Quality of life by the dermatological quality of life scale (DLQI and DLQI adapted to children)
  • Dermatologist's assessment of efficacy of study treatment [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Dermatologist's global assessment of efficacy using a visual analogic scale (0-10)
  • Efficacy of study treatment [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Decrease of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) and Tissue Factor (TF) plasma levels Platelet count, and fibrinogen, D-dimers, factor V levels supporting the presence and disappearance of an abnormal intravascular coagulation consumption
  • Adverse events and safe adverse events will be compared [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Adverse events and safe adverse events will be compared using the Mc Nemar test, if applicable. Otherwise, descriptive statistics (percentages) will be estimated.
  • Organic collection of skin and blood samples [ Time Frame: at 5 month or 6 month or 7 month or 8 month or 9 month after inclusion ]
    From the organic collection (including blood and skin samples), genetic analysis of several genes involved in vasculogenesis (currently TIE2 and PIK3CA) will be performed. A genotype/phenotype study will be carried out.
  • Efficacy of study treatment measured on digital photographs [ Time Frame: inclusion, switch from the observational period to the sirolimus period (between 4 and 8 month), switch+1month, 12 month ]
    Qualitative assessment of efficacy on digital photographs
  • Self assessment of efficacy of study treatment [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Patient self assessment or proxy (parents) self assessements using visual analogic scale (0-10):
    • Global treatment efficacy on a visual analogic scale (0-10)
    • Skin complications/symptoms (seepage, bleeding, skin tension, functional impairment)
    • Pain
    • Quality of life by the dermatological quality of life scale (DLQI and DLQI adapted to children)
  • Dermatologist's assessment of efficacy of study treatment [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Dermatologist's global assessement of efficacy using a visual analogic scale (0-10)
  • Efficacy of study treatment [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Decrease of VEGF and TF plasma levels Platelet count, and fibrinogen, D-dimers, factor V levels supporting the presence and disappearance of an abnormal intravascular coagulation consumption
  • Adverse events and safe adverse events will be compared [ Time Frame: Participants will be followed during 12 months ]
    Adverse events and safe adverse events will be compared using the Mc Nemar test, if applicable. Otherwise, descriptive statistics (percentages) will be estimated.
  • Organic collection of skin and blood samples [ Time Frame: at 5 month or 6 month or 7 month or 8 month or 9 month after inclusion ]
    From the organic collection (including blood and skin samples), genetic analysis of several genes involved in vasculogenesis (currently TIE2 and PIK3CA) will be performed. A genotype/phenotype study will be carried out.
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
suPERficial Slow-flow Vascular malFORMations Treated With sirolimUS
Treatment of Superficial Voluminous Complicated Slow-flow Vascular Malformations With Sirolimus: a Phase 2 Trial in Children Observational-phase Designed

The most recent classification, adopted by International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) in 1996, and updated in Melbourne in 2014, divides these lesions into two broad categories: vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular malformations (VMs) are subdivided into high-flow VM and slow-flow VM.

Slow-flow VMs consist of congenital anomalies which may involve abnormal capillaries vessels, venous vessels, lymphatic vessels or combination of several of them. They can be superficial (involving cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues) and/or may have visceral involvement. They can be limited or diffuse, and are sometimes components of genetic hypertrophic syndromes.

The diagnosis of slow-flow VMs is performed on physical examination (biopsy may be required for confirmation), and is completed with imaging (ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Slow-flow VMs may be particularly voluminous; associated with underlying hypertrophy responsible for functional impairment; painful; associated with seepage or continuous cutaneous bleeding; complicated with visceral signs or hematologic disturbances (anemia, thrombopenia). Management requires dedicated multispecialty care. There are no guidelines for treatment, and management may include no intervention - but natural history of these VMs is progressive worsening -, compression by physical bandage, sclerotherapy, resection (when feasible),anti-inflammatory or anti-coagulation drugs.

Case reports and series have provided evidence for supporting the need for a clinical trial of sirolimus by reporting successful treatment on several children with complicated vascular anomalies. The choice of sirolimus is rational. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulated by phosphoinositide-3-kinase involved in cell mobility, cell growth and angiogenesis. Sirolimus inhibits mTOR, which induces inhibition of angiogenesis, in particular lymphangiogenesis, which has been demonstrated in several models.

Vascular anomalies include a heterogeneous group of disorders of newborns and children. While infantile hemangioma are common (10% of infants), generally not complicated and easily managed, the majority of other vascular anomalies are rare (<2% altogether) and have no guidelines for management. The most recent classification, adopted by International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) in 1996, divides these lesions into two broad categories: vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular malformations (VMs) are subdivided into high-flow VM and slow-flow VM.

Slow-flow VMs consist of congenital anomalies which may involve abnormal capillaries vessels, venous vessels, lymphatic vessels or combination of several of them. They can be superficial (involving cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues) and/or may have visceral involvement. They can be limited or diffuse, and are sometimes components of genetic hypertrophic syndromes. They always result from defective embryologic vasculogenesis.

The diagnosis of slow-flow VMs is performed on physical examination - a biopsy may be required for confirmation -, and is completed with imaging, which includes ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Slow-flow VMs may be simple to manage or can be complicated for several reasons: they may be particularly voluminous; associated with underlying hypertrophy responsible for functional impairment; painful; associated with seepage or continuous cutaneous bleeding; complicated with visceral signs or hematologic disturbances (anemia, thrombopenia). Management requires dedicated multispecialty care. There are no guidelines for treatment, and management may include no intervention - but natural history of these VMs is progressive worsening -, compression by physical bandage, sclerotherapy, resection (when feasible), anti-inflammatory or anti-coagulation drugs.

The vast majority of literature reporting medical therapies consists of paediatric case reports, and is complicated by publication bias, inconsistent use of nomenclature and absence of clinical trials. Case reports and series have provided evidence for supporting the need for a clinical trial of sirolimus by reporting successful treatment on several children with complicated vascular anomalies. The choice of sirolimus is rational. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulated by phosphoinositide-3-kinase involved in cell mobility, cell growth and angiogenesis. Sirolimus inhibits mTOR, which induces inhibition of angiogenesis, in particular lymphangiogenesis, which has been demonstrated in several models.

Randomized observational-phase design (Feldman et al. J Clin Epidemiol 2001;54:550-557):

  • each patient will be followed during a 12-month-period
  • each patient will start by an observational period and will end being treated by sirolimus
  • at a random date (between month 4 and month 8), each patient will switch from the observational period to the sirolimus period Therefore, each patient will be his/her own control, as in a cross-over trial (but the difference is that the cross-over is all in one direction, from observational period to treatment period). This explains why variation in volume will be standardized by period durations.

As specified by Feldman et al, the randomized placebo-phase design is well adapted in situations where "a placebo controlled study would be perceived as being unacceptable by enrolling physicians and by patient" and "may be especially useful when highly potent therapies for rare diseases"

Interventional
Phase 2
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Vascular Malformation
Drug: Sirolimus
  • each patient will be followed during a 12-month-period
  • each patient will start by an observational period and end being treated by sirolimus
  • at a random date (between month 4 and month 8), each patient will switch from the observational period to the sirolimus period
Other Name: rapamune
  • No Intervention: Observational

    Patients will first be included in an observational period, then, at a randomized time different from one to another, will all receive the experimental treatment (i.e. sirolimus).

    This design has been defined a the "randomized placebo-phase design" (Feldman et al. J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Jun;54(6):550-7)

  • Experimental: Experimental
    At a randomized date, patients will start treatment with sirolimus (beginning dose: 0.08mg/kg/day)
    Intervention: Drug: Sirolimus
Maruani A, Boccara O, Bessis D, Guibaud L, Vabres P, Mazereeuw-Hautier J, Barbarot S, Chiaverini C, Blaise S, Droitcourt C, Mallet S, Martin L, Lorette G, Woillard JB, Jonville-Bera AP, Rollin J, Gruel Y, Herbreteau D, Goga D, le Touze A, Leducq S, Gissot V, Morel B, Tavernier E, Giraudeau B; Groupe de Recherche de la Societé Française de Dermatologie Pédiatrique. Treatment of voluminous and complicated superficial slow-flow vascular malformations with sirolimus (PERFORMUS): protocol for a multicenter phase 2 trial with a randomized observational-phase design. Trials. 2018 Jun 27;19(1):340. doi: 10.1186/s13063-018-2725-1.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Active, not recruiting
63
50
March 2019
March 2019   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Patients aged from 6 years to 18 years
  • With a slow-flow vascular malformation confirmed by MRI, included or not into a genetic disorder, among the following:
  • microcystic lymphatic malformation
  • mixed micro- and macrocystic malformation
  • venous malformation
  • combined lymphatic and venous malformation
  • Malformation voluminous and complicated (pain, functional impairment, bleeding, seepage)
  • Extended to the underlying subcutaneous tissue, to the fascias, the muscles and/or the underlying bone
  • MRI of the VM performed within 8 months
  • Vaccination schedule updated
  • Informed, written consent of the subject's parents or the 18 years old subject
  • Cooperative parent or subject, aware of the necessity and duration of controls so that perfect adhesion to the protocol could be expected
  • Subjects or subject's parents covered by or having the rights to social security.

Exclusion criteria:

  • Slow-flow VMs which are only macrocystic lymphatic malformations
  • Visceral life-threatening involvement
  • Patients who received prior per os treatment with an mTOR inhibitor
  • Immunosuppression (immunosuppressive disease or immunosuppressive treatment)
  • Known chronic infectious disease
  • History of cancer in the 2 previous years
  • Brest feeding or pregnant women, or women on childbearing age without effective contraception, up to 12 weeks after treatment discontinuation
  • Known allergy to mTOR inhibitor
  • Concomitant treatment that inhibits or activates CYP3A4, and P-gp glycoprotein, cytotoxic drugs, antilymphocyte immunoglobulines and metoclopramide
  • Intolerance to fructose, intolerance or malabsorption to glucose, galactose, metabolic insufficiency in sucraseisomaltase, metabolic defect in lactase
  • Known allergy to peanuts or soyabean
  • Liver insufficiency (elevated transaminases > 2.5 N)
  • Anemia with Hb < 9 g/dl
  • Leukopenia < 1000/mm3
  • Thrombocytopenia < 80 000/mm3
  • Hypercholesterolemia (LDL-cholesterol ≥ 2g/l)
  • Patients with risk of opportunistic infections
  • Contraindication of MRI
  • Known allergy to lidocaïne
  • Live attenuated vaccine up to 3 months after sirolimus discontinuation
  • Subject already participating to a therapeutic study
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
6 Years to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
France
 
 
NCT02509468
PHRN14-AM/PERFORMUS
2015-001096-43 ( EudraCT Number )
Yes
Not Provided
Not Provided
University Hospital, Tours
University Hospital, Tours
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Annabel Maruani, MD, PhD CHRU Tours
University Hospital, Tours
September 2018

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP