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Energy Supplements to Improve Exercise Tolerance in Metabolic Myopathies

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02448667
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : May 19, 2015
Last Update Posted : January 20, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):

May 15, 2015
May 19, 2015
January 20, 2017
January 2015
November 2017   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
maximal work capacity [ Time Frame: After up to 1 hour of bicycling on the 2nd and 4th day. ]
Area Under the Curve (AUC)
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT02448667 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Peak oxygen consumption [ Time Frame: After up to 1 hour of cycling on the 2nd and 4th day. ]
    (VO2peak)
  • Peak workload [ Time Frame: After up to 1 hour of cycling on the 2nd and 4th day. ]
    (Wpeak)
  • Peak respiratory exchange ratio [ Time Frame: After up to 1 hour of cycling on the 2nd and 4th day. ]
    (RER)
  • p-lactate [ Time Frame: measured at rest and max on day 1, and before first dose of soft drink, before exercise and every 10 minutes during exercise at day 2 and 4. ]
  • Heart rate [ Time Frame: Continously during the cycle test (max. 1 hour) on the 2nd and 4th day ]
  • Borg score [ Time Frame: Measured periodically during the cycle test (max. 1 hour) on the 2nd and 4th day ]
  • Peak oxygen consumption [ Time Frame: After up to 1 hour of cycling on the 2nd and 4th day. ]
    (VO2peak)
  • Peak workload [ Time Frame: After up to 1 hour of cycling on the 2nd and 4th day. ]
    (Wpeak)
  • Peak respiratory exchange ratio [ Time Frame: After up to 1 hour of cycling on the 2nd and 4th day. ]
    (RER)
  • Peak lactate [ Time Frame: measured every 10 minutes during exercise test at day 2 and 4 and once on day 3 and 5. ]
  • Heart rate [ Time Frame: Continously during the cycle test (max. 1 hour) on the 2nd and 4th day ]
  • Borg score [ Time Frame: Measured periodically during the cycle test (max. 1 hour) on the 2nd and 4th day ]
  • Respiratory exchange ratio, RER [ Time Frame: measured continously during the exercise test day 2 and 4. ]
  • p-glucose [ Time Frame: measured at rest and max on day 1, and before first dose of soft drink, before exercise and every 10 minutes during exercise at day 2 and 4. ]
  • Pain [ Time Frame: Assessed on days 3 and 5 of the trial ]
    Visual analog scale (VAS)
  • Fatigue [ Time Frame: Assessed on days 3 and 5 of the trial ]
    Fatigue Severity Score (FSS)
  • p-Creatine kinase [ Time Frame: measured on day 1, 3 and 5. ]
    To asses muscle damage
  • p-myoglobin [ Time Frame: measured on day 1, 3 and 5. ]
    To asses muscle damage
  • p-free fatty acids [ Time Frame: measured before first dose of soft drink, before exercise and every 10 minutes during exercise at day 2 and 4. ]
  • p-ketone bodies [ Time Frame: measured at rest and max on day 1, and before first dose of soft drink, before exercise and every 10 minutes during exercise at day 2 and 4. ]
  • p-ammonia [ Time Frame: measured at rest and max on day 1, and before exercise, at 10 minutes, 20 min of exercise and at max on day 2 and 4. ]
  • p-insulin [ Time Frame: measured at rest and max on day 1 and before exercise and every 10 minutes during exercise at day 2 and 4. ]
  • p-glucagon [ Time Frame: measured at rest and max on day 1, and before exercise, at 10 minutes, 20 min of exercise and at max on day 2 and 4. ]
  • p-catecholamines [ Time Frame: measured at rest and max on day 1, and before exercise, at 10 minutes, 20 min of exercise and at max on day 2 and 4. ]
  • p-sodium [ Time Frame: before exercise on day 2 and 4 ]
    To eliminate electrolyt status as a confounding factor
  • p-potassium [ Time Frame: before exercise on day 2 and 4 ]
    To eliminate electrolyt status as a confounding factor
  • Hypoglycemic episodes [ Time Frame: 2 hour observation after each of the two exercise test. ]
  • Respiratory exchange ratio, RER [ Time Frame: measured continously during the exercise test day 2 and 4. ]
  • substrates, metabolites and hormones [ Time Frame: measured at 10 min. intervals during the exercise test day 2 and 4 and once on day 3 and 5. ]
  • Pain [ Time Frame: Assessed on days 3 and 5 of the trial ]
    Visual analog scale (VAS)
  • Fatigue [ Time Frame: Assessed on days 3 and 5 of the trial ]
    Fatigue Severity Score (FSS)
  • Creatine kinase [ Time Frame: measured on day 1, 3 and 5. ]
  • myoglobin [ Time Frame: measured on day 1, 3 and 5. ]
  • glucose levels [ Time Frame: measured every 10 minutes during exercise test at day 2 and 4 and once on day 3 and 5. ]
 
Energy Supplements to Improve Exercise Tolerance in Metabolic Myopathies
Energy Supplements to Improve Exercise Tolerance in Metabolic Myopathies
Patients suffering from the metabolic myopathy Glycogen Storage Disease type IIIa (GSDIIIa) have a problem releasing sugar stored in cells that is needed for energy production. This causes several systemic impairments, but only recently have the exercise-related symptoms in the muscles been examined. A previous study showed signs that intravenous infusion of glucose relieves some of these symptoms. The purpose of this study is to investigate in a randomized and placebo-controlled fashion whether oral ingestion of sugar can alleviate muscular symptoms in patients with GSDIIIa.
It has recently been documented how patients with GSDIIIa have a moderate to severely reduced exercise capacity, and that exercise induces muscle pain and cramps. These symptoms are caused by the inability to mobilize skeletal muscle glycogen and are most likely the consequence of a severe energy deficiency within muscles. The study changed the phenotype of GSDIIIa, to include exercise-induced symptoms, which is a typical presentation in other metabolic myopathies. It also documented that exercise capacity was significantly improved while exercise-induced muscular symptoms were relieved by an intravenous glucose infusion. Based on these findings, this study wishes to investigate if oral ingestion of sucrose has the same effects on work capacity on a larger number of patients, in a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over setup. Ingestion of sucrose has the potential to be an effective, cheap and easily accessible dietary treatment of muscular symptoms in GSDIIIa.
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Glycogen Storage Disease Type III
  • Dietary Supplement: FAXE Kondi
    Sucrose and glucose containing softdrink
  • Dietary Supplement: Faxe Kondi Free
    Diet softdrink with artificial sweeteners aspartame and acesulfame potassium. Both sweeteners are approved for use as food additives in the European Union and by the FDA. Aspartame metabolism is well understood and normal doses does not affect plasma concentrations of lipids, amino acids, glucose levels, key regulatory hormones or skeletal muscle metabolism. Acesulfame Potassium is not metabolized in humans and is excreted as the parent compound in urine. Since the two artificial sweeteners does not affect skeletal muscle metabolism or blood glucose levels, and both compounds have a well documented safety profiles, FAXE Kondi Free is considered to be an ideal placebo soft drink in this study.
  • Experimental: FAXE Kondi - a sugary soft-drink
    100 ml FAXE Kondi (10 grams of carbohydrates per 100 ml) is ingested every ten minutes during exercise plus 400 ml before exercise start.
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: FAXE Kondi
  • Placebo Comparator: FAXE Kondi Free - a sugarfree soft-drink
    100 ml FAXE Kondi Free (0 grams of carbohydrates per 100 ml) is ingested every ten minutes during exercise plus 400 ml before exercise start.
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: Faxe Kondi Free

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
15
February 2018
November 2017   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Genetically and/or biochemically verified GSDIIIa.
  • 18 years or older.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Clinically significant cardiac or pulmonary disease.
  • Pregnancy or lactation.
  • Severe mental disorders or participants that are in other ways unable to understand the purpose of the trials.
  • Subjects where the investigator assess that it is not possible or very difficult to place an intravenous catheters.
  • Other conditions of the joints or skeletal muscle such as arthritis or sprains. If the condition is expected to resolve before the study inclusion period is stopped, the subject may be included at a later time.
  • Moderate to severe muscle weakness, where the participants are not expected to complete 10 minutes of cycle-ergometry exercise at 70 % of VO2peak.
  • Verified diabetes.
  • Participation in other clinical trials that may interfere with the results.
  • Medications that may interfere with the results or increase the risk of bleeding.
  • Blood-clotting or bleeding disorders.
  • Blood donation one month or less prior to inclusion.
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Yes
Contact: Astrid E Buch, BSc Medicine +45 35 45 61 35 astrid.emilie.buch.02@regionh.dk
Contact: Nicolai Preisler, MD +45 35 45 61 26 nicolai.preisler@regionh.dk
Denmark
 
 
NCT02448667
H-4-2014-014
No
Not Provided
Plan to Share IPD: No
Astrid Emilie Buch, Rigshospitalet, Denmark
Rigshospitalet, Denmark
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Astrid E Buch, BSc Medicine Copenhagen Neuromuscular Center
Rigshospitalet, Denmark
January 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP