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Can Ondansetron Prevent Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) in Babies Born to Narcotic-dependent Women (AIM2NAS)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01965704
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : October 18, 2013
Last Update Posted : January 1, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):

October 15, 2013
October 18, 2013
January 1, 2018
December 2013
April 2018   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome [ Time Frame: 35 days ]
The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) will be measured by the need for pharmacologic treatment for the symptoms of NAS while the neonates are receiving study medication and for the 30 days after stopping the study medication.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01965704 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome [ Time Frame: 35 days ]
Severity of NAS will be measured by: the length of hospital stay (birth to discharge); the total dose of narcotic required to treat the symptoms of NAS; and the need to include barbiturates in the treatment of the symptoms of NAS.
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Can Ondansetron Prevent Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) in Babies Born to Narcotic-dependent Women
AIM 2- Prevention of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

The Investigators hope to learn if they can prevent or lessen the symptoms of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in babies born to narcotic-dependent mothers by using the drug ondansetron in the mothers prior to delivery and their babies after delivery.

The study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with one half the mother-baby pairs to receive ondansetron and the other half of the mother-baby pairs to receive placebo. The pregnant narcotic-dependent mothers will receive an intravenous dose of study medication prior to delivery; the neonates, after their birth, will receive the same study medication the mother received every 24 hours for up to 5 days.

The Investigators will follow up with the mother-baby pairs for 10 days after study drug has stopped and one last follow up, about 30 days after stopping study drug, to learn if the baby had any symptoms of NAS in that time period.

All neonates will have a screening 12-lead EKG prior to their first dose of study medication to determine if QTc prolongation is present. A repeat 12-lead EKG will be done after each dose of study medication, approximately 2-5 hours post dose; if a neonate has prolonged QTc the study drug will be stopped.

Investigators may obtain up to 9 pharmacokinetic (PK) blood samples from the neonates over 5 days when standard of care blood samples are drawn. These samples will consist of 1 to 2 drops of blood collected on filter paper and sent to Stanford for PK analysis.

The modified Finnegan scoring system will be used to evaluate neonates for symptoms of NAS at each site and it is considered standard-of-care for babies at risk of NAS. Morphine will be the first treatment choice before other treatment medication choices (opioid or non-opioid) for NAS symptoms. Each site involved has established guidelines for starting, advancing and weaning treatment for NAS. Any medication used to treat NAS will be recorded.

Interim analysis: will be performed after the first 20 pregnant women and their neonates have been enrolled and dosed with study drug. (Interim Analysis was done on first 21 mother/baby pairs in May 2016).

To protect the confidentiality of the patients (study subjects), the lead site, Stanford University, received a Certificate of Confidentiality from the NIH.

Interventional
Phase 2
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • Narcotic Addiction
  • Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
  • Drug: Ondansetron
    Pregnant women may receive a second dose of IV ondansetron if they have not delivered within 4 hours of receiving the IV study medication. 50% of the 90 mother/baby pairs will receive ondansetron; the baby will always get the same study medication as the mother.
    Other Name: Zofran
  • Drug: Placebo
    All doses of placebo, whether IV or oral, will mimic the same volume as the ondansetron group to maintain the blind. Pregnant women may receive a second dose of IV placebo if they have not delivered within 4 hours of being given the IV study medication. 50% of the 90 mother/baby pairs will receive placebo; the baby will always receive the same study medication as the mother.
    Other Name: IV Normal saline; oral simple syrup
  • Experimental: Ondansetron
    Pregnant Women: ondansetron 8mg intravenously (IV) within 4 hours of delivery. Neonates: ondansetron 0.07 mg/kg given orally every 24 hours starting 4-8 hours after delivery, for up to 5 days (if IV line available in neonate, ondansetron 0.04 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for up to 5 days).
    Intervention: Drug: Ondansetron
  • Placebo Comparator: Placebo

    Pregnant Women: placebo given intravenously prior to delivery (volume to mimic the IV volume of the ondansetron group).

    Neonates: placebo given orally every 24 hours, starting 4-8 hours after delivery, for up to 5 days with volume to mimic the oral volume of the ondansetron group (if IV line available, placebo may be given IV).

    Intervention: Drug: Placebo
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
90
June 2018
April 2018   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • adult female, opioid-dependent for at least 3 weeks prior to delivery.
  • adult female, otherwise healthy.
  • adult female, age 18-45 years inclusive.
  • adult female, signed consent to participate for self and neonate (maternal subject may decide not to receive the study drug but her neonate can still be included in the study).
  • neonate, gestational age 37 weeks through 41 weeks and 6 days at birth.
  • neonate, corrected QT interval (QTc) from 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) less than 480 milliseconds (ms).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • adult female, any condition that, in the opinion of the investigator, would compromise the health of the participant (both mother and fetus) or the integrity of the data.
  • adult female, known allergy to study drug (ondansetron).
  • adult female, screening 12-lead ECG, if done, showing prolonged QTc will stop the mother from receiving any study drug but her neonate can still be included in the study.
  • adult female, not dependent on opioids for at least 3 weeks prior to delivery.
  • adult female, generally not healthy.
  • adult female, age 17 years or less or 46 years of age and older.
  • adult female and neonate, the maternal ingestion or administration of ondansetron within 24 hours prior to delivery, for reasons other than study purposes, will exclude the mother and the neonate.
  • neonate, preterm or post-term gestational age at delivery.
  • neonate, QTc showing results greater than or equal to 480ms on any 12-lead ECG post delivery will stop the dosing of the study drug, but safety follow up will be done if the mother or baby received at least one dose of study drug.
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
up to 45 Years   (Child, Adult)
No
Contact: Carol A Cohane, RN 650-736-8231 cohane@stanford.edu
United States
 
 
NCT01965704
Aim 2_RO1-HD-070795-01A1
NAS2 ( Other Identifier: Stanford )
Yes
Not Provided
Plan to Share IPD: No
Plan Description: We will not share any individual participant data with other researchers.
David R. Drover, Stanford University
Stanford University
  • Santa Clara Valley Medical Center
  • University of California, San Francisco
  • University of Utah
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • University of Tennessee Health Science Center
  • University of Louisville
  • Thomas Jefferson University
Principal Investigator: David R Drover, MD Stanford University
Stanford University
October 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP