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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Irritability in Adolescents With High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified July 2014 by Denis Sukhodolsky, Yale University.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01631851
First Posted: June 29, 2012
Last Update Posted: July 8, 2014
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Denis Sukhodolsky, Yale University
June 27, 2012
June 29, 2012
July 8, 2014
May 2011
December 2014   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
ABC Irritability Scale [ Time Frame: 1 week ]
Parent rating of irritability and disruptive behavior that has been often used in studies with children with ASD
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01631851 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Irritability in Adolescents With High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder
Not Provided
In addition to the core symptoms, children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often exhibit disruptive behavior problems including irritability, tantrums, noncompliance, and aggression. This is a pilot study of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, also known as Anger Control Training, in adolescents with high-functioning ASD. CBT teaches children to recognize antecedents and consequences of problem behavior and to use emotion regulation and problem-solving skills to reduce irritability, aggression and noncompliance. This form of CBT has been well-studied in typically developing children with disruptive behavior and we are investigating if this treatment can be feasible and helpful, with appropriate modifications, for irritability and disruptive behavior in ASD.
Not Provided
Interventional
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Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Autism
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD
  • Asperger's Disorder
  • Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD-NOS)
Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Irritability
CBT is an individually administered behavioral interventions aimed at reducing irritability and disruptive behavior. There are 10 to 12 weekly sessions that are conducted with the child and the parent. During these sessions children are taught to recognize antecedents and consequences of problem behavior and to use emotion regulation and problem-solving skills to reduce irritability, aggression and noncompliance.
Other Name: Anger Control Training
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Unknown status
10
December 2014
December 2014   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, or PDD-NOS
  • presence of disruptive behaviors such as irritability and anger outbursts
  • IQ above 80
  • Unmedicated or on stable medication

Exclusion Criteria:

  • medical or psychiatric condition that would require alternative treatment
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
9 Years to 16 Years   (Child)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT01631851
0102012121-B
No
Not Provided
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Denis Sukhodolsky, Yale University
Yale University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Denis Sukhodolsky, Ph.D. Yale University, Child Study Center
Yale University
July 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP