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Reduction in YEllow Plaque by Aggressive Lipid LOWering Therapy (YELLOW)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Annapoorna Kini, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01567826
First received: March 28, 2012
Last updated: April 11, 2017
Last verified: April 2017
March 28, 2012
April 11, 2017
May 2010
February 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Lipiscan - Lipid Core Burden Index (LCBI) [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    The regression of yellow plaque content from the atherosclerotic lipid pool after statin therapy by utilizing NIR spectroscopy as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention. Spectroscopic information obtained from raw spectra was transformed into a probability of lipid core that was mapped to a red-to-yellow color scale, with the low probability of lipid shown as red and the high probability of lipid shown as yellow. Analyses were performed offline using the Matlab-based software, as previously published. Yellow pixels within the analyzed segment were divided by all viable pixels to generate the lipid-core burden index (LCBI). The maximal value of LCBI for each nonculprit obstructive lesion was recorded and used for comparison.
  • LCBI4mm Max [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    LCBI4mm max = change in lipid-core burden index at the 4-mm maximal segment. Spectroscopic information obtained from raw spectra was transformed into a probability of lipid core that was mapped to a red-to-yellow color scale, with the low probability of lipid shown as red and the high probability of lipid shown as yellow. Yellow pixels within the analyzed segment were divided by all viable pixels to generate the lipid-core burden index (LCBI). The maximal value of LCBI for each nonculprit obstructive lesion was recorded and used for comparison.
  • Change in LCBI4mm Max [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Change in LCBI4mm max at 6-8 weeks after intervention as compared to baseline. LCBI4mm max = change in lipid-core burden index at the 4-mm maximal segment.
  • Change in LCBI, Lesion [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks post intervention ]
    Change in LCBI at 6-8 weeks after intervention as compared to baseline
Lipiscan - Lipid core burden (LCBI) [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
The study will assess the regression of yellow plaque content from the atherosclerotic lipid pool after statin therapy by utilizing NIR spectroscopy as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention.
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01567826 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Parameters [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]

    Change in atheroma volume and lumen CSA on IVUS as related to change in yellow plaque index as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention.

    Data not analyzed. Data not available.

  • Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) Value [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Change in FFR as related to change in yellow plaque index as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention. Fractional flow reserve (FFR), defined as the ratio of maximum flow in the presence of a stenosis to normal maximum flow, is a lesion-specific index of stenosis severity that can be calculated by simultaneous measurement of mean arterial, distal coronary, and central venous pressure.
  • Diameter Stenosis [ Time Frame: Baseline and 6-8 weeks post intervention ]
    Percentage stenosis of vessel diameter in the analysis segment of nontarget lesions as measured by angiography that remained >70%, after successful PCI of the target lesion.
  • Post PCI Cardiac Enzymes [ Time Frame: at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Correlation of yellow plaque index with post procedure CK-MB, Troponin-I release.
  • Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) [ Time Frame: at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    MACE defined as a combined clinical endpoint of death, MI (Q wave or non Q-wave with CK-MB >3 times above the upper normal limit (48 U/L), urgent revascularization or stroke at 30 days and 1 year. Details reported in adverse events section.
  • Blood Chemistry - HsCRP [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Correlation of yellow plaque index with changes in levels of blood HsCRP as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention
  • Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) Value [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Change in FFR as related to change in yellow plaque index as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention.
  • Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Parameters [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Change in atheroma volume and lumen CSA on IVUS as related to change in yellow plaque index as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention.
  • Post PCI Cardiac Enzymes [ Time Frame: at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Correlation of yellow plaque index with post procedure CK-MB, Troponin-I release.
  • Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) [ Time Frame: at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    MACE defined as a combined clinical endpoint of death, MI (Q wave or non Q-wave with CK-MB >3 times above the upper normal limit (48 U/L), urgent revascularization or stroke at 30 days and 1 year.
  • Blood Chemistry - HsCRP [ Time Frame: at baseline and at 6-8 weeks after intervention ]
    Correlation of yellow plaque index with changes in levels of peripheral blood/serum leukocytes, leukocyte sub-types, HsCRP as compared from baseline to 6-8 weeks after intervention
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Reduction in YEllow Plaque by Aggressive Lipid LOWering Therapy
Reduction in YEllow Plaque by Aggressive Lipid LOWering Therapy. (YELLOW Trial)
The study will assess the regression of yellow plaque content of the lipid pool after aggressive lipid therapy by utilizing NIR spectroscopy. Statin therapy using Rosuvastatin 10-40 mg will be compared to the statin therapy of either Atorvastatin or Simvastatin. This is a single site study. A total of 100 subjects will randomized, of which 40 will receive intensive lipid therapy (Rosuvastatin 40mg) and 40 will receive standard care lipid lowering therapy.
Coronary artery disease (CHD) remains to be a leading cause of death in most countries (1) (2). It is well known that reducing cholesterol level by statin therapy is associated with significant reduction in plaque burden. REVERSAL (3) and ASTEROID (4) trials showed that in patients with coronary artery disease lipid-lowering with atorvastatin or rosuvastatin respectively reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis and even cause repression of some lesions. CHD clinical events are related to plaque instability due to lipid content within the atherosclerotic plaque. High dose atorvastatin has shown to reduce the plaque lipid contents on serial IVUS analysis at 12 months. Therefore reduction in lipid content and thereby the plaque burden by lipid lowering therapy may stabilize the plaque and reduce cardiovascular events. High sensitivity C-reactive Protein (HsCRP) is an inflammatory biomarker that independently predicts future vascular events. In JUPITER (5) trial rosuvastatin (Crestor) significantly reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people with elevated HsCRP. IVUS was utilized to demonstrate change in coronary artery vessel wall morphology over a relatively short period of time, but provided no data on the lipid content in the vessel wall. The application of NIR spectroscopy to identify lipid deposition within coronary arteries has been validated in ex vivo studies. Infrared spectra are collected as follows: Light of discrete wavelengths from a laser is directed onto the tissue sample via glass fibers. Light scattered from the samples is collected in fibers and launched into a spectrometer. The plot of signal intensity as a function of wavelength was used to develop chemometric models to discriminate lipid-cores from non-atherosclerotic tissue, and from atherosclerotic tissue that is predominantly fibrotic and from blood elements.
Interventional
Phase 4
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Investigator
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Coronary Artery Disease
  • Drug: standard of care lipid therapy

    Patients will be randomized in a 1:1 fashion to receive either A) Rosuvastatin (Crestor) 40mg daily, or B) standard-care lipid-lowering therapy.

    Zocor, Lipitor [any dose] and Crestor [less than 40mg]

    Other Names:
    • Zocor
    • Lipitor
    • (Zocor, Lipitor, Crestor)
  • Drug: Aggressive lipid therapy
    Patients will be randomized in a 1:1 fashion to receive either A) Rosuvastatin (Crestor) 40mg daily, or B) standard-care lipid-lowering therapy.
    Other Names:
    • Rosuvastatin
    • Crestor
  • Active Comparator: standard of care lipid therapy
    standard-care lipid-lowering therapy: Zocor or Lipitor
    Intervention: Drug: standard of care lipid therapy
  • Experimental: aggressive lipid therapy
    aggressive lipid therapy: Crestor
    Intervention: Drug: Aggressive lipid therapy

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
87
February 2012
February 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patient > 18 years of age and willing to participate
  • Stable patients who will undergo cardiac catheterization and PCI (intent to stent)
  • Patient is willing to go on a cholesterol lowering medication for the duration of the study and willing to change statin therapy to the randomized statin therapy regardless of previous statin therapy and dose (e.g. Atorvastatin 80 mg) Patients that are screened for this study and are receiving another Statin such as Pravachol will be required to be willing to change their therapy to Rosuvastatin as per is randomization. If patients are receiving another statin, such as pravachol, or any other agent, and are at appropriate Lipid levels, they will be permitted to continue this therapy (if randomized to the standard therapy arm). There are a virtually unlimited number of possible scenarios for potential combination of all Lipid lowering agents at the time of enrollment that patients may be taking.
  • Signed written Informed Consent
  • Women of childbearing potential must agree to be on an acceptable method of birth control/contraceptive such as barrier method (condoms/diaphragm); hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, implants (Norplant) or injections (Depo-Provera)); Intrauterine Device; or abstinence (no sexual activity).
  • Fluency in English and/or Spanish

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients who have acute myocardial infarction (Q wave or non-Q wave with CK-MB > 5 times above the upper normal (31.5 ng/ml) within 72 hours)
  • Patients who are in cardiogenic shock
  • Patients with left main disease or restenotic lesions
  • Patients with elevated CK-MB (> 6.5 ng/ml) or Tnl (> 0.5ng/L) at baseline
  • Patients with platelet count < 100,000 cell/mm3
  • Patients who have co-morbidity which reduces life expectancy to one year
  • Patients who are currently participating in another investigational drug/device study
  • Patients with known hypersensitivity to HMG CO-A reductase therapy (statins)
  • Patients with liver disease
  • Patient with creatinine > 2.0 mg/dL
  • Pregnant women and women of childbearing potential who intend to have children during the duration of the trial
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT01567826
GCO 09-1294
IF1292822
Yes
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Annapoorna Kini, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Annapoorna Kini
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Annapoorna Kini, MD Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
April 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP