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Understanding Medication Adherence Among HIV Patients

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01305590
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 28, 2011
Last Update Posted : April 3, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

November 30, 2010
February 28, 2011
April 3, 2018
July 2011
July 2011   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Commitment Preferences for Increasing Medication Adherence [ Time Frame: Up to 4 months ]
We will measure whether participants prefer more commitment, in the form of a "Take-Medication-Get-Paid" plan; less commitment, in the form of an "Attend-Clinic-Get-Paid" plan; or if they would prefer to designate their own levels of commitment.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01305590 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Medication Adherence and Commitment Preference [ Time Frame: Up to 4 months ]
We will measure how subjects' medication adherence affects their stated commitment preferences.
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Understanding Medication Adherence Among HIV Patients
Understanding Medication Adherence Among HIV Patients
In anticipation of a pilot study incorporating behavioral economics into the treatment of infectious diseases, we will conduct a survey with HIV/AIDS patients at the Ponce Clinic (Infectious Disease Program of Grady Memorial Hospital, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA).
We are planning a study to improve health outcomes among patients with HIV/AIDS using insights from behavioral economics and financial incentives. We will conduct a survey with HIV/AIDS patients at Ponce Clinic (Infectious Disease Program of Grady Memorial Hospital, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA). The patients will be low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS and possessing varying degrees of medication adherence. We want to better understand how this particular population would react to commitment devices designed to increase medication adherence. We will survey participants to see if they would prefer more commitment, in the form of a "Take-Medication-Get-Paid" plan; less commitment, in the form of an "Attend-Clinic-Get-Paid" plan; or if they would prefer to designate their own levels of commitment.
Interventional
Not Applicable
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Intervention Model Description:

We will survey participants to see if they would prefer more commitment, in the form of a "Take-Medication-Get-Paid" plan; less commitment, in the form of an "Attend-Clinic-Get-Paid" plan; or if they would prefer to designate their own levels of commitment.

The study also included 70 individuals in a passive control (PC) arm, who did not receive financial incentives. Individuals in the PC arm were not enrolled in the randomized trial but met basic study eligibility criteria during the same time period.

Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Patient Commitment Preferences for Medication Adherence
Other: Survey to Understand Medication Adherence among HIV Patients
We want to better understand how this particular population would react to commitment devices designed to increase medication adherence. We will survey participants to see if they would prefer more commitment, in the form of a "Take-Medication-Get-Paid" plan; less commitment, in the form of an "Attend-Clinic-Get-Paid" plan; or if they would prefer to designate their own levels of commitment.
Survey
We will survey participants to see if they would prefer more commitment, in the form of a "Take-Medication-Get-Paid" plan; less commitment, in the form of an "Attend-Clinic-Get-Paid" plan; or if they would prefer to designate their own levels of commitment.
Intervention: Other: Survey to Understand Medication Adherence among HIV Patients
Alsan M, Beshears J, Armstrong WS, Choi JJ, Madrian BC, Nguyen MLT, Del Rio C, Laibson D, Marconi VC. A commitment contract to achieve virologic suppression in poorly adherent patients with HIV/AIDS. AIDS. 2017 Jul 31;31(12):1765-1769. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001543.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
200
Same as current
July 2011
July 2011   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

* HIV/AIDS patients currently receiving treatment at the Ponce Clinic at the Infectious Disease Program of Grady Memorial Hospital (Emory University School of Medicine).

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT01305590
0004
P01AG005842 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Principal Investigator: David I Laibson, Ph.D National Bureau of Economic Research
National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
March 2018

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP