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Demonstration of Near Zero Antibiotic Prescribing for Acute Bronchitis

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jeffrey A. Linder, Brigham and Women's Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01240174
First received: November 10, 2010
Last updated: January 30, 2017
Last verified: January 2017

November 10, 2010
January 30, 2017
March 2011
June 2014   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Antibiotic prescribing rate [ Time Frame: 30 days ]
The antibiotic prescribing rate for patients with acute bronchitis
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01240174 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Patient symptoms [ Time Frame: 21 days ]
  • Patient satisfaction [ Time Frame: 21 days ]
  • Patient safety [ Time Frame: 30 days ]
  • Healthcare costs [ Time Frame: 30 days ]
  • The capture and description of the components that had the greatest effect on the antimicrobial prescribing rate [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Demonstration of Near Zero Antibiotic Prescribing for Acute Bronchitis
Demonstration of Near Zero Antibiotic Prescribing for Acute Bronchitis
Studies show, guidelines state, and performance measures assert that antibiotic prescribing for uncomplicated acute bronchitis is inappropriate. However, clinicians prescribe antimicrobials in over 60% of the 22.5 million acute bronchitis visits in the United States each year. Previous successful interventions have only reduced the antimicrobial prescribing rate to 40% or 50%. It is unknown if the antimicrobial prescribing rate for acute bronchitis can be brought to near zero percent in actual practice while maintaining patient safety and satisfaction. The goal of this study is to develop an Electronic Health Record (EHR)-integrated algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of adults with acute bronchitis with a goal of reducing the antibiotic prescribing rate to near zero percent.
We will use a multi-modal implementation - including computerized decision support, reporting tools, and clinician feedback - and quality improvement techniques to ensure adherence to the algorithm and reduce the antimicrobial prescribing rate to near zero percent. The duration of the intervention will be 4 years.
Interventional
Not Provided
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: No masking
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
  • Bronchitis
  • Cough
Behavioral: Demonstration of near zero antibiotic prescribing for patients with acute bronchitis
A controlled, continuously-monitored, implementation of an EHR-integrated diagnosis and treatment algorithm for acute bronchitis in a large, diverse primary care practice.
Intervention Arm
Single arm in the study of doctors receiving feedback about their antibiotic prescribing rate for acute bronchitis.
Intervention: Behavioral: Demonstration of near zero antibiotic prescribing for patients with acute bronchitis
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
400
July 2014
June 2014   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • first visit in 30 days, age 18-64, has a cough of less than 3 weeks duration

Exclusion Criteria:

  • infiltrate on chest x-ray, has chronic lung disease
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 64 Years   (Adult)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT01240174
2010P001247
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Jeffrey A. Linder, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Principal Investigator: Jeffrey A Linder, MD, MPH Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Brigham and Women's Hospital
January 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP