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The Effect of Five-Toed Socks on Postural Control Among Active Individuals Who Have Chronic Ankle Instabilities

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified September 2010 by University of Toledo Health Science Campus.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01210612
First Posted: September 28, 2010
Last Update Posted: December 17, 2010
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
University of Toledo Health Science Campus
June 23, 2010
September 28, 2010
December 17, 2010
September 2010
December 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Center of Pressure [ Time Frame: separate testing days, one week apart ]
The primary outcome measurement for this study will be to determine differences in Center of Pressure (COP) and static postural control patterns in individuals with and without CAI during the single limb balance test. Additionally, performance will be compared with eyes-open and eyes-closed.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01210612 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
reaching distances [ Time Frame: separate testing days, one week apart ]
The secondary outcome measurement for this study will be to determine differences in the mean value of the three reaching distances (the anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial direction) of the SEBT in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
The Effect of Five-Toed Socks on Postural Control Among Active Individuals Who Have Chronic Ankle Instabilities
The Effect of Five-Toed Socks on Postural Control Among Active Individuals Who Have Chronic Ankle Instabilities
Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is one of the most common injuries in sports. There is a unique style of socks that have become popular in Japan among athletes that could also improve postural control. The purpose of the study is to determine the effectiveness of five-toed socks on dynamic postural control in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.
Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is one of the most common injuries in sports. Ankle braces and orthotic insoles also have been shown to influence the neuromuscular control system by enhancing the proprioceptive and cutaneous afferent inputs to the central nerve system; thereby improving postural control. There is a unique style of socks that have become popular in Japan among athletes that could also improve postural control by enhancing cutaneous afferent inputs from the plantar surface of the foot and toes. The purpose of the study is to determine the effectiveness of five-toed socks on dynamic postural control in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Lateral Ankle Sprain
Device: five-toed socks
five-toed socks usage
  • Active Comparator: Without Unilateral CAI
    Intervention: Device: five-toed socks
  • Active Comparator: With Unilateral CAI
    Intervention: Device: five-toed socks
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Unknown status
30
December 2010
December 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • member of university community
  • All subjects will be physically active (at least 30 minutes of sustained exercise 3 times/week

Exclusion Criteria:

  • history of: knee or hip musculoskeletal injury or surgery
  • history of: fracture or dislocation of the testing ankle or leg
  • neurological problems
  • vestibular disorders or concussions within the last 6 months
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 30 Years   (Adult)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT01210612
UTHSC-12
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Phillip Gribble, PhD, ATC, University of Toledo, HSC
University of Toledo Health Science Campus
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Phillip Gribble University of Toledo
University of Toledo Health Science Campus
September 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP