Evaluating Factors That Impact Loss to Follow-up Among Postpartum HIV-infected Women in Mississippi

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Brown University
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Binford Nash, University of Mississippi Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01190605
First received: August 26, 2010
Last updated: December 5, 2014
Last verified: December 2014

August 26, 2010
December 5, 2014
July 2010
September 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
linked to long-term HIV care [ Time Frame: within six months of delivery ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
retrospective chart review for documentation of visit attendance
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01190605 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • assessment for depression [ Time Frame: cross-sectional at time of study visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    use of Edinburgh depression screening tool
  • assessment of intimate partner violence [ Time Frame: cross-sectional at time of study visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    use of WEB (Women's Experience with Battering) screening tool
  • assessment of stigma [ Time Frame: cross-sectional at time of study visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    use of HIV Related Experiences screening tool
  • attended a postpartum visit [ Time Frame: within six months of delivery ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    retrospective chart review for documentation of visit attendance
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Evaluating Factors That Impact Loss to Follow-up Among Postpartum HIV-infected Women in Mississippi
Evaluating Factors That Impact Loss to Follow-up Among Postpartum HIV-infected Women in Mississippi

Women with HIV infection in Mississippi who are pregnant or who have had their baby in the past year can agree to fill out a questionnaire about what helps or hurts return to care for HIV infection after having a baby. The combined results should show the most common things that keep women from getting care for HIV infection after having a baby. This will help design another study in order to help more women get into care for HIV infection after having a baby.

Following recruitment and completion of informed consent, a participant will be given a questionnaire to look at factors that help or hinder access to HIV care after delivery. After finishing the initial questionnaire the participant will get a Wal-Mart gift card for $15. The participant may then be asked to complete a longer interview for which she would receive an additional gift card for $25. The combined results will be used to design an interventional study to improve entry into HIV care after delivery.

Observational
Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Not Provided
Not Provided
Non-Probability Sample

Women in Mississippi with HIV infection who have been pregnant and received perinatal HIV care at University of Mississippi Medical Center are eligible to participate in a questionnaire study on the factors that affect entry into HIV care after delivery

HIV
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
53
July 2013
September 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • age 18 years or older
  • women with HIV infection who are pregnant or up to 2 months postpartum
  • English speaking
  • able to give informed consent
Female
18 Years to 45 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01190605
2010-0131
No
Binford Nash, University of Mississippi Medical Center
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Brown University
Principal Investigator: Binford T Nash, MD University of Mississippi Medical Center
University of Mississippi Medical Center
December 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP