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Pilot Study to Estimate the Burden and Distribution of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria in Kalifabougou, Mali in Preparation for a Prospective Cohort Study of Naturally-Acquired Malaria Immunity

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01160562
First received: July 9, 2010
Last updated: June 30, 2017
Last verified: January 23, 2013
July 9, 2010
June 30, 2017
June 23, 2010
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01160562 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Pilot Study to Estimate the Burden and Distribution of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria in Kalifabougou, Mali in Preparation for a Prospective Cohort Study of Naturally-Acquired Malaria Immunity
Pilot Study to Estimate the Burden and Distribution of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria in Kalifabougou, Mali in Preparation for a Prospective Cohort Study of Naturally-Acquired Malaria Immunity
Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a global public health threat. Leading malaria vaccine candidates confer only partial short-lived protection at best. An understanding of the mechanisms by which humans acquire malaria immunity through repeated P. falciparum infections may aid the development of a malaria vaccine. This pilor study is designed to initiate the epidemiological groundwork for a future prospective cohort study of acquired malaria immunity in Kalifabougou, Mali, a rural village of approximately 5 000 individuals who are exposed to seasonal P. falciparum transmission each year from July through December. This study will estimate the age-stratified point prevalence of P. falciparum infection before the malaria season and at the peak of the 6-month malaria season, and it will estimate the age-stratified incidence of symptomatic p. falciparum infection during the 6-month malaria season. The spatial distribution of asymptomatic P. falciparum infections and incident malaria cases within the village of Kalifabougou will be determined by merging the prevalence and incidence data with census and Global Positioning System (GPS) data.
Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a global public health threat. Leading malaria vaccine candidates confer only partial short-lived protection at best. An understanding of the mechanisms by which humans acquire malaria immunity through repeated P. falciparum infections may aid the development of a malaria vaccine. This pilor study is designed to initiate the epidemiological groundwork for a future prospective cohort study of acquired malaria immunity in Kalifabougou, Mali, a rural village of approximately 5 000 individuals who are exposed to seasonal P. falciparum transmission each year from July through December. This study will estimate the age-stratified point prevalence of P. falciparum infection before the malaria season and at the peak of the 6-month malaria season, and it will estimate the age-stratified incidence of symptomatic p. falciparum infection during the 6-month malaria season. The spatial distribution of asymptomatic P. falciparum infections and incident malaria cases within the village of Kalifabougou will be determined by merging the prevalence and incidence data with census and Global Positioning System (GPS) data.
Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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  • Malaria, Falciparum
  • Plasmodium Falciparum
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
4000
January 23, 2013
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  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

Cross-sectional Survey:

Individuals (ages 2-25 years) are eligible to enter the cross-sectional study if they agree to:

  • Live in Kalifabougou for the next 5 months.
  • Have blood specimens stored for future studies.

Passive Surveillance:

All individuals who live in Kalifabougou and present to the Kalifabougou health center with suspected malaria will be eligible to enroll in the passive surveillance component of the protocol.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
up to 25 Years   (Child, Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Mali
 
 
NCT01160562
999910155
10-I-N155
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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
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Principal Investigator: Peter D Crompton, M.D. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
January 23, 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP