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The CLOQS Trial - Countdown Lights to Optimize Quality in Stroke (CLOQS)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
University Health Network, Toronto
St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr. Richard H. Swartz, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01148602
First received: June 17, 2010
Last updated: December 7, 2015
Last verified: December 2015

June 17, 2010
December 7, 2015
June 2010
April 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Improved door-to-CT and door-to-needle times. [ Time Frame: 18 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Improved door-to-CT scan times and door-to-needle treatment times with tPA, with potentially improved response to treatment and reduction in adverse events.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01148602 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
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The CLOQS Trial - Countdown Lights to Optimize Quality in Stroke
The CLOQS Trial - Countdown Lights to Optimize Quality in Stroke
To reduce door-to-needle times in acute stroke treatment. Using an organizational behaviour intervention (a large stopwatch), we will post a visual cue to remind all parties that "time is brain". We hypothesize that this simple visual cue will improve door-to-CT scan times and door-to-needle treatment times, and thus improve treatment response, and reduce adverse events.
We will construct a large, "in-your-face" red LED stopwatch-clock that is the intervention. The clock will be attached to the stretcher of patients presenting for hyperacute stroke treatment (consideration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment at the moment of their Emergency department arrival. This will act as a constant visual reminder to all team members (physicians, RN's, CT technologists) of the urgency of the situation. The study will be a block randomization, by week of presentation. All patients presenting during "on" weeks will have a stopwatch timer with them during the hyperacute stroke workup. During "off" weeks, the clocks will not be used.
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Acute Stroke
Other: LED stopwatch-clock timers
We will attach a large, "in-your-face" red LED stopwatch-clock timers to the patient's stretcher at the moment of ED arrival to act as a constant visual reminder to all team members (physicians, RN's, CT technologists) of the urgency of the situation.
Other Names:
  • Clocks
  • CLOQS
  • Clock
  • LED countdown timer
  • No Intervention: 'Off Clock'
    Stopwatch timers will NOT be used for "off clock" weeks, so patients presenting with hyperacute stroke will be managed normally without the visual timer.
  • Active Comparator: 'On Clock"
    LED stopwatch-clock timers will be posted for all patients presenting during "ON clock" weeks. All patients presenting with hyperacute stroke will be managed normally with the addition of a visual stopwatch timer.
    Intervention: Other: LED stopwatch-clock timers
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
3452
April 2012
April 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All patients who present to the emergency room with acute stroke for consideration of treatment with tPA.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients presenting to the emergency room (door time) more than 4.5 hours after symptom onset
Both
Child, Adult, Senior
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT01148602
UTSP Innovation
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Dr. Richard H. Swartz, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
  • University Health Network, Toronto
  • St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto
Principal Investigator: Richard Swartz, MD University of Toronto Stroke Program
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
December 2015

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP