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Saliva Composition and Oral Hygiene in Children With Celiac Disease Before and After the Change in Diet

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01129908
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 25, 2010
Last Update Posted : December 20, 2016
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Moti Moskovitz, Hadassah Medical Organization

May 23, 2010
May 25, 2010
December 20, 2016
May 2010
July 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01129908 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Saliva Composition and Oral Hygiene in Children With Celiac Disease Before and After the Change in Diet
Saliva Composition and Oral Hygiene in Children With Celiac Disease Before and After the Change in Diet

The celiac disease (CD) is a disease with an immune and genetic component that is activated by the presence of gluten, and damages the intestine mucosa and causes malabsorption of food.

In the oral environment the investigators see enamel defects and recurrent ulcers.

Celiac patients have to keep a restrict gluten-free diet, in order to prevent the clinical symptoms of the disease (such as diarrhea, stomach ache and weight loss).

It has been assumed that the patients have less cariogenic diet, and that caries prevalence is not as high as in normal population.

In celiac patients the investigators find enamel defects that are characterized with pits and deep fissures and sometimes the complete loss of enamel. These defects are classified by the grading of the CD related DED's (dental enamel defects) according to Aine. These defects are symmetrical defects in the permanent dentition, in teeth that develops at the same time. The cause is thought to be hypocalcaemia or genetic.

These defects were found in 42.2% of celiac patients in appose to only 5.4% in healthy population.

Recurrent ulcers were found in 41% in the oral cavity of celiac patients, compare to 27% in healthy population.

After changing the diet to a gluten-free diet, an improvement is seen in the presence of these ulcers.

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Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Non-Probability Sample
chilren with celiac disease
Celiac Disease
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
90
Same as current
July 2012
July 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • celiac disease

Exclusion Criteria:

  • no other systemic condition
  • age 3-18
  • children on medication
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
3 Years to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT01129908
odelia- HMO-CTIL
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Moti Moskovitz, Hadassah Medical Organization
Hadassah Medical Organization
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Hadassah Medical Organization
December 2016