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Intrabronchial Airway Pressures in Intubated Patients During Bronchoscopy

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01078831
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 2, 2010
Last Update Posted : November 11, 2010
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Oslo University Hospital

March 1, 2010
March 2, 2010
November 11, 2010
March 2002
April 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Changes in ventilation, airway pressures and blood gases after bronchoscope insertion. [ Time Frame: 2 minutes after bronchoscope insertion/ mode change ]
paO2, paCO2 (kPa), airway and ventilator pressures (cmH2O)
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01078831 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Intrabronchial Airway Pressures in Intubated Patients During Bronchoscopy
Intrabronchial Airway Pressures in Intubated Patients During Bronchoscopy Under Volume Controlled (VC) and Pressure Controlled (PC) Ventilation
The purpose of this study is to examine changes in ventilation and airway pressures during conventional bronchoscopy of intubated patients.
Mechanically ventilated patients often need bronchoscopy as a diagnostic procedure or for visually directed elimination of secretions. Partial endotracheal tube occlusion by the bronchoscope increases airflow resistance. Inhibition of inspiratory flow may be compensated for by augmented inspiratory pressure. Reduced expiratory flow however, cannot be compensated for by most ventilators and could lead to higher airway - and intrathoracic pressures that are not detected by pressure transducers in the ventilator tubing. In this study we compare changes in ventilation, airway pressures, ventilator pressures and blood gases during bronchoscopy of intubated patients in both volume controlled and pressure controlled ventilation. Our hypothesis are that 1) increased resistance in the tube during bronchoscopy leads to high intrabronchial airway pressures when the ventilator is in volume controlled mode, and 2) when the ventilator is in pressure controlled mode, increased resistance in the tube during bronchoscopy leads to reduced Tidal Volume and moderately increased paCO2.
Observational
Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples Without DNA
Description:
Arterial blood gases
Probability Sample
ARDS/ALI patients on mechanical ventilation where a therapeutic or diagnostic bronchoscopy has been requested by the staff physician.
  • Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
  • Acute Lung Injury (ALI)
Other: Bronchoscopy
Airway pressures, ventilation changes and blood gas changes are recorded in a group of intubated patients on mechanical ventilation before and after bronchoscope insertion. The registration is done immediately before a therapeutic/diagnostic bronchoscopy requested by a staff physician not involved n the study.
ARDS / ALI patients
Intervention: Other: Bronchoscopy
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
20
Same as current
April 2010
April 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • ARDS/ALI patients on mechanical ventilation
  • endotracheal tube size 7-9mm
  • age > 18 years
  • therapeutic or diagnostic bronchoscopy requested by staff physician

Exclusion Criteria:

  • SpO2 < 90%
  • unstable BP
  • pneumothorax
  • acute cardiovascular disease
  • cerebrovascular or other condition that requires stable BP and saturation
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 85 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Norway
 
 
NCT01078831
REK-HO Ref 191-01055, 03052001
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Fredrik Borchsenius, MD, Head of Department for Pulmonary Medicine, Oslo University Hospital
Oslo University Hospital
Not Provided
Study Director: Helge Opdahl, MD, PhD Oslo University Hospital - Ulleval, Norway
Study Director: Ole H Skjønsberg, MD, PhD Ullevaal University Hospital
Study Director: Fredrik Borchsenius, MD Ullevaal University Hospital
Oslo University Hospital
November 2010