We updated the design of this site on September 25th. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Medial Versus Lateral Approach in Ultrasound (US)-Guided Supraclavicular Block

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified January 2010 by University Health Network, Toronto.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00992810
First Posted: October 9, 2009
Last Update Posted: January 26, 2010
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
University Health Network, Toronto
October 8, 2009
October 9, 2009
January 26, 2010
August 2009
August 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Successful block of the Ulnar nerve (C8,T1) fibres. Sensory block with a score of '1' at 30 minutes (loss of sensation to pin prick) is considered successful. [ Time Frame: 1 hour prior to surgery ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00992810 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Medial Versus Lateral Approach in Ultrasound (US)-Guided Supraclavicular Block
Medial vs. Lateral Approach to Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Block: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial
The ultrasound guided supraclavicular block is a peripheral nerve block which is considered safe, has a fast onset, is dense and provides complete block of the nerves supplying the hand, forearm and arm. However retrospective studies done at Toronto Western Hospital have highlighted the fact that most commonly the ulnar nerve fibres (responsible for sensations in the ring finger, little finger and the corresponding part of hand), sometimes escape this block and need additional supplementary block at a distal peripheral nerve site. It is a confusing fact since all nerve fibres are compactly arranged in a sheath at the supraclavicular level. The local anaesthetic agent at this level should be equally distributed among all nerve fibres. The purpose of this study is to compare two different approaches (medial and lateral) adopted by our clinicians to perform this block and to test the effectiveness of each approach for successful ulnar nerve fibre blockade.
Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Hand or Arm Surgery
  • Procedure: Lateral-to-Medial Approach
    Approach of the needle to administer the brachial plexus nerve block will be done in a lateral-to-medial direction.
  • Procedure: Media-to-Lateral Approach
    Approach of the needle to administer the brachial plexus nerve block will be done in a medial-to-lateral direction.
  • Experimental: Lateral-to-Medial Approach
    Needle approach to the brachial plexus nerves will be made using a lateral-to-medial direction.
    Intervention: Procedure: Lateral-to-Medial Approach
  • Experimental: Medial-to-Lateral Approach
    Needle approach to the brachial plexus nerves will be made using a lateral-to-medial direction.
    Intervention: Procedure: Media-to-Lateral Approach
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Unknown status
78
September 2010
August 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adult patients presenting for upper limb surgery, excluding shoulder surgery
  • Age 18-80 yrs
  • BMI < 35
  • ASA I - III
  • Consent for the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pre-existing sensory or motor neurodeficit.
  • Sensitivity to local anaesthetic agents.
  • Patients on anticoagulants or antiplatelet medications (Minidose Aspirin is acceptable) with abnormal coagulation profile.
  • Compromised pulmonary reserve due to COPD, Kypho-scoliosis or Restricted lung disease.
  • Infection or any obvious pathology at the site of block performance
  • History of drug abuse.
  • Psychiatric disease or any condition that precludes an informed consent.
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
 
NCT00992810
09-0451-B
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Dr. Richard Brull, University Health Network
University Health Network, Toronto
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Richard Brull, MD University Health Network, Toronto
University Health Network, Toronto
January 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP