We are updating the design of this site. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Types of Starch and Their Effect on Blood Glucose, Appetite and Food Intake

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00980941
First Posted: September 21, 2009
Last Update Posted: September 21, 2009
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
Ingredion Incorporated
Information provided by:
University of Toronto
September 18, 2009
September 21, 2009
September 21, 2009
December 2007
April 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Blood glucose [ Time Frame: 0-170 min ]
  • Food intake [ Time Frame: at 30 min after the treatment ]
  • Appetite [ Time Frame: 0-170 min ]
Same as current
No Changes Posted
  • Water intake [ Time Frame: at 30 min ]
  • Palatability of treatments [ Time Frame: 0-170 min ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Types of Starch and Their Effect on Blood Glucose, Appetite and Food Intake
The Effect of Different Types of Starch on Glycemic Response, Subjective Appetite and Short-term Food Intake in Young Men
The investigators hypothesize that different types of starch vary in their effects on appetite, blood sugar and food intake. In this study, subjects consumed five soups containing 50 g of whole grain, high amylose corn, regular corn or maltodextrin starches or no added starch at one week intervals. The investigators measured food intake at 30 minutes, appetite and blood sugar.
Not Provided
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • Obesity Prevention
  • Diabetes Prevention
Dietary Supplement: soup with or without starch
  • Experimental: Soup with no added starch
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: soup with or without starch
  • Experimental: Soup + 50 g of whole grain starch
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: soup with or without starch
  • Experimental: Soup + 50 g of high amylose corn starch
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: soup with or without starch
  • Experimental: Soup + 50 g of regular corn starch
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: soup with or without starch
  • Experimental: Soup + 50 g maltodextrin starch
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: soup with or without starch
Anderson GH, Cho CE, Akhavan T, Mollard RC, Luhovyy BL, Finocchiaro ET. Relation between estimates of cornstarch digestibility by the Englyst in vitro method and glycemic response, subjective appetite, and short-term food intake in young men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Apr;91(4):932-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28443. Epub 2010 Feb 17.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
17
June 2009
April 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy males with a BMI of 20-24.9 kg/m2

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Females
  • Smokers
  • Breakfast skippers
  • Individuals with diabetes or other metabolic diseases
Sexes Eligible for Study: Male
20 Years to 30 Years   (Adult)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
 
NCT00980941
Starch study 1
National Starch_ethics_21513
Yes
Not Provided
Not Provided
G. Harvey Anderon, Professor, University of Toronto
University of Toronto
Ingredion Incorporated
Principal Investigator: Harvey Anderson, Ph.D. University of Toronto
University of Toronto
September 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP