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Study of the Effect of Inhaled Anesthetics on Diastolic Heart Function Using a Doppler-derived Efficiency Index

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00907439
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 22, 2009
Last Update Posted : November 5, 2010
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Washington University School of Medicine

May 20, 2009
May 22, 2009
November 5, 2010
November 2008
October 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Diastolic efficiency index (derived from the parameterized analysis of transmitral early filling Doppler using the paradigm of the ventricle as a damped harmonic oscillator) [ Time Frame: Following induction of volatile anesthesia ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00907439 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Diastolic efficiency index (derived from the parameterized analysis of transmitral early filling Doppler using the paradigm of the ventricle as a damped harmonic oscillator) [ Time Frame: Following the onset of controlled ventilation ]
Same as current
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Study of the Effect of Inhaled Anesthetics on Diastolic Heart Function Using a Doppler-derived Efficiency Index
Changes in Diastolic Dysfunction With the Onset of Volatile Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting as Determined by a Load-independent Efficiency Index Derived From the Parameterized Doppler Analysis of Left Ventricular Filling
The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of inhaled anesthetic drugs upon diastolic heart function (heart suction and filling performance) in patients who are undergoing coronary bypass surgery.
Diastolic heart dysfunction is a significant cause of cardiovascular morbidity and is the cause of symptomatic heart failure in approximately one half of patients who are admitted to hospitals with heart failure symptoms. However, diastolic heart function remains difficult to measure objectively without cardiac catheterization. Diastolic heart dysfunction is also common among patients undergoing coronary bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Despite the ubiquitous use of inhaled volatile drugs to maintain anesthesia in these patients, their effects upon diastolic heart function remain unclear.
Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Non-Probability Sample
Patients undergoing non-emergent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery at a tertiary care center
  • Diastolic Dysfunction
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • General Anesthesia
Not Provided
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
21
25
October 2010
October 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Non-emergent coronary bypass grafting surgery
  • Left ventricular ejection fraction of 40% or greater

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Myocardial infarction within 4 weeks
  • Greater than mild cardiac valvular pathology
  • Body mass index greater than 35
  • Cardiac dysrhythmias or pacemaker therapy
  • Left bundle branch block
  • Uncontrolled gastroesophageal reflux disease
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00907439
WU-HRPO-07-0551
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Troy Wildes, MD, Assistant Professor, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology
Washington University School of Medicine
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Troy S Wildes, MD Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology
Washington University School of Medicine
November 2010