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Genetic Association Mapping of Malaria Resistance in Anopheles Gambiae

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00850655
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 25, 2009
Last Update Posted : October 26, 2016
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute

October 16, 2008
February 25, 2009
October 26, 2016
March 2008
March 2015   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
mosquito infection [ Time Frame: one week ]
Protocol involves non-invasive blood draw from participant screened by finger-prick for infection with malaria. Drawn blood (0.5cc) is placed in artificial membrane feeder for feeding of mosquitoes. Primary outcome is infection of mosquitoes, detectable one week after blood feeding.
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00850655 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Genetic Association Mapping of Malaria Resistance in Anopheles Gambiae
Genetic Association Mapping of Malaria Resistance in Anopheles Gambiae
This is a study of the genetics of malaria transmission by the mosquito vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. The study focuses on the mosquito vector, not the human subjects infected with malaria. DNA extracted from infected mosquitoes will be analyzed genetically by microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify mosquito genes that control mosquito resistance to malaria parasites.
A standard diagnostic blood smear from a drop of blood will be carried out on 20 study subjects once per month. One malaria-positive subject from among the 20 will be asked to donate 5cc of blood, also no more frequently than once per month. The blood will be placed in a water-jacketed heated membrane feeding device that will be positioned on top of a cage of mosquitoes. The mosquitoes are attracted to the warmth and drink the blood through the artificial skin-like membrane. The goal of the research is to study the infected mosquitoes. No studies will be carried out on the human subjects. The point of human subjects involvement is to obtain the naturally malaria-infected blood for feeding of mosquitoes. After blood feeding, the mosquitoes are held in an environmental chamber for one week, at which time they are dissected to count numbers of malaria parasites developing on the mosquito stomach wall. This number constitutes the quantitative phenotype, and we extract genomic DNA from the carcass for genetic marker typing, which constitutes the genotype. Genetic linkage analysis identifies markers near genes that control parasite number, thus resistance or susceptibility to parasite infection.
Observational
Observational Model: Ecologic or Community
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
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Non-Probability Sample
community sample
Malaria
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
20
Same as current
March 2015
March 2015   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 5-10 years old, and general good health

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Outside age group
  • Specific diagnosable health problems
  • General poor health
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
5 Years to 10 Years   (Child)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00850655
0607M88827
Yes
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Plan to Share IPD: No
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
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Principal Investigator: Kenneth D Vernick, PhD University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
October 2016