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Evaluation of the Public Health Impact of Seasonal Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPT) in Children in Senegal

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified September 2009 by London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Recruitment status was:  Enrolling by invitation
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00712374
First Posted: July 10, 2008
Last Update Posted: September 22, 2009
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
Senegal: Ministere de la Sante
Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement
Cheikh Anta Diop University, Senegal
Information provided by:
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
July 8, 2008
July 10, 2008
September 22, 2009
September 2008
December 2011   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
All-causes mortality [ Time Frame: 2008-2010 ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00712374 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Incidence of malaria by passive case detection [ Time Frame: 2008-2010 ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Evaluation of the Public Health Impact of Seasonal Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPT) in Children in Senegal
Evaluation of the Public Health Impact and Cost Effectiveness of Seasonal Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Children in Senegal
In areas of seasonal malaria transmission the burden of severe disease and mortality due to malaria is mainly among children under 5 years of age. Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) with antimalarial drugs given to all children once a month during the transmission season is a promising new strategy for malaria prevention. Studies in Senegal, Ghana, Mali and The Gambia have shown this approach can be highly effective. In Senegal, seasonal IPT with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and one dose of artesunate resulted in a 90% reduction in incidence of clinical malaria in a recent trial in Senegal (Cisse et al., Lancet 2006). The purpose of the present project is to determine the public health impact and cost effectiveness of this intervention when it is delivered through the routine health service to communities in rural areas in Senegal. Demographic surveillance will be set up in the rural population of three districts (Mbour, Bambey and Fatick) which comprises approximately 540,000 people, including 100,000 children under 5 yrs, and is served by 54 health posts, as an expansion of the area covered by the existing DSS of Niakhar. Information about births, deaths and migrations, household characteristics such as socioeconomic status, and vaccination status of children and their use of bednets, will be recorded in 6-monthly rounds of all households. In selected areas, deaths among children under 10 years will be investigated using verbal autopsies. Over four years from September 2008 - November 2011, seasonal IPT (three monthly administrations of SP (sulfalene-pyrimethamine) plus amodiaquine during the transmission season each year to children 3-59 months of age) will be introduced gradually, in a step-wedge design, by 9 health posts in 2008, by an additional 18 posts in 2009, and another 18 in 2010 and 9 in 2011. At the end of each transmission season, a cross-sectional survey of 2400 children under 5 yrs of age, in which finger prick blood samples will be taken, will be used to estimate the prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance to Plasmodium falciparum, the prevalence of anaemia and the nutritional status of children. Malaria incidence will be monitored by passive surveillance through health posts, health centres, and hospitals. Cost effectiveness will be assessed. Due to changes in the epidemiology of malaria in the study area, the upper age limit for inclusion was increased from 5 to 10 years old from September 2009.
Not Provided
Interventional
Phase 4
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Malaria
Drug: sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine

SP+AQ on three occasions during the malaria transmission season

Intermittent Preventive Treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine

Experimental: Intervention
Children 3 months to 10 years old will receive a treatment dose of SP+AQ on three occasions during the malaria transmission season, delivered by the local health post
Intervention: Drug: sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Unknown status
100000
July 2012
December 2011   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 3-119 months at time of first administration of IPT in September
  • Consent of mother or carer and the local community

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of allergy to SP or AQ
  • Age < 3 months or >119 months at time of first administration of IPT in September

From 2009, the age for inclusion has been changed from 3-59 months to 3 months to 10 years of age.

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
3 Months to 119 Months   (Child)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Not Provided
 
 
NCT00712374
PSP01
40099
Yes
Not Provided
Not Provided
Prof Oumar Gaye, Universite Cheikh Anta Diop
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
  • Senegal: Ministere de la Sante
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement
  • Cheikh Anta Diop University, Senegal
Study Director: Oumar Gaye, PhD Universite CHeikh Anta Diop
Principal Investigator: Badara Cisse, PhD London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Principal Investigator: Cheikh Sokhna, PhD IRD, Dakar
Principal Investigator: Oumar Faye, MD Ministere de la Sante et de la Prevention
Principal Investigator: Paul Milligan, PhD London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
September 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP