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Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Acceptance by African-American Parents: Identifying Psychosocial Barriers

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00680147
First Posted: May 19, 2008
Last Update Posted: May 21, 2015
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Peter A. Vanable, Syracuse University
May 15, 2008
May 19, 2008
May 21, 2015
July 2008
February 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
completed vaccination with Gardasil [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00680147 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
assessed cross-sectionally, at time of initial enrollment [ Time Frame: assessed at time of baseline assessment ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Acceptance by African-American Parents: Identifying Psychosocial Barriers
HPV Vaccination Acceptance by African-American Parents: Identifying Psychosocial Barriers
This will enroll 300 mothers of teenage girls and boys to identify barriers to HPV vaccination among low-income, African-American teens.
The HPV vaccine offers hope that the incidence of cervical cancer can be greatly reduced in the U.S. and globally. However, because the vaccine is recommended for children and early adolescents, vaccine awareness and acceptance among parents is critical to insuring vaccine uptake and public health benefit. Although culturally specific concerns may reduce HPV vaccination among African-American youth, research has not addressed this possibility. Accordingly, the proposed study will enroll 300 mothers in a study to identify barriers to HPV vaccination among low-income, African-American teens. Surveys assessing culturally-specific barriers to HPV vaccination acceptance will be administered to both parents and their vaccine-eligible children. Upon completion of the survey, parents with vaccine-eligible daughters will be invited to receive a free HPV vaccination for their child through a local, teen-friendly health clinic. Outcome analyses will focus on identification of predictors of completed vaccinations among girls and barriers to vaccine acceptance among mothers of teenage sons. Our study will provide critically important behavioral outcome data linking barriers to vaccination to subsequent vaccination decisions in a real-world, health care setting.
Interventional
Phase 2
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
HPV
Behavioral: brief informational intervention to promote HPV vaccine acceptance
Teen and parent participants will receive a brief informational intervention that provides basic facts about the HPV vaccine, including the health benefits and three-dose requirements, along with information regarding where to go to receive the vaccination. A coupon for a free HPV vaccination will provided to the parent for use by their teenage daughter.
Experimental: Brief HPV vaccine informational intervention
Because we anticipated that knowledge and awareness of the HPV vaccine would be low in our study population, our CASI survey included a brief, informational overview of key facts concerning HPV vaccination prior to assessing vaccine acceptance, perceived barriers to vaccination, and intentions to vaccinate. The overview lasted approximately 3 minutes and consisted of a brief overview of key HPV vaccination facts that were presented visually (on the computer screen) and read aloud using a digital recording. HPV and vaccine knowledge, awareness, and attitudes items were administered prior to participants hearing the informational overview.
Intervention: Behavioral: brief informational intervention to promote HPV vaccine acceptance
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
614
February 2012
February 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Females parent or guardian with an African-American daughter or son between the ages of 11 and 17
  • African-American adolescents between the ages of 11-17
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
11 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00680147
IISP ID# 33546
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Peter A. Vanable, Syracuse University
Syracuse University
Not Provided
Not Provided
Syracuse University
May 2015

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP