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Tamoxifen for Progressive Transitional Cell Carcinoma Following Previous Chemotherapy Treatment

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00710970
First Posted: July 8, 2008
Last Update Posted: August 22, 2013
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
AstraZeneca
Cytogen Corporation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Seth Lerner, Baylor College of Medicine
July 7, 2008
July 8, 2008
December 27, 2012
August 22, 2013
August 22, 2013
January 2007
December 2011   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Tamoxifen : Tamoxifen is Administered at 20 mg/Day as a Single Daily Oral Dose. Tamoxifen is Continued Until Progressive Disease or Intolerable Grade 3 or 4 Side Effects Occur Due to Tamoxifen. [ Time Frame: To progression ]
  • Sustained Stable Disease is Considered to be Clinically Important. Hence, 4-month Freedom From Progression (FFP) (Stable Disease + Partial Response + Complete Response) is Chosen as the Primary End-point Instead of Response Rate. [ Time Frame: 4 months ]
Sustained Stable Disease is Considered to be Clinically Important. Hence, 4-month Freedom From Progression (FFP) (Stable Disease + Partial Response + Complete Response) is Chosen as the Primary End-point Instead of Response Rate. [ Time Frame: 4 months ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00710970 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
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Not Provided
 
Tamoxifen for Progressive Transitional Cell Carcinoma Following Previous Chemotherapy Treatment
H-16848 - Phase II Pilot Study With Correlative Markers of Tamoxifen for Progressive Transitional Cell Carcinoma Following Previous Chemotherapy

The major objective of this two-stage phase II study is to determine whether tamoxifen is deserving of further study in metastatic bladder cancer. Tamoxifen is expected to function as a cytostatic (and not cytotoxic) agent, and may produce more disease stability than regression. Sustained stable disease is considered to be clinically important and the more likely event. Hence, 4-month freedom from progression is chosen as the primary end-point instead of response rate. Freedom from progression is defined as the period from start of therapy to the time of objective radiologic progression. A total of 25 subjects will be enrolled, 15 during stage 1 and 10 during stage 2 of a two-stage minimax design phase II study.

Pre-therapy evaluation (within 3 weeks of initiation of therapy):

  • History and physical examination (H and P)
  • Performance status (PS) assessment
  • CBC (complete blood counts)
  • CMP (complete metabolic profile)
  • Pregnancy test (in women younger than 50)
  • Computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis
  • Bone scan if bone pain or raised alkaline phosphatase
  • Biopsy (may use previous biopsy specimen)
  • Samples of plasma from the routine CBC and CMP will be banked indefinitely for future biomarker studies at the Scott Department of Urology.

Treatment plan: Therapy will be administered as an outpatient. Tamoxifen is administered at 20 mg/day as a single daily oral dose. Clinical assessment of patients by a history and physical examination will be performed every 4 weeks (one cycle). Objective radiological assessment of response will be made every 8 weeks or earlier if clinically indicated. A CT (computerized tomography) scan of the abdomen, pelvis and chest will be performed at baseline and every 2 cycles. A response is confirmed by repeating the scans in 4 weeks. Bone scan is performed if the patient complains of new bone pain or has raised alkaline phosphatase. A radiologist who is blinded to the treatment regimen reads the scans. The RECIST criteria are used to define response. Tamoxifen is continued until progressive disease or intolerable side effects occur.

Not Provided
Interventional
Phase 2
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Drug: Tamoxifen
Tamoxifen is administered at 20 mg/day as a single daily oral dose. Tamoxifen is continued until progressive disease or intolerable grade 3 or 4 side effects occur due to tamoxifen.
Other Name: raloxifene
Experimental: Single Arm Receiving 25mg Tamoxifen
Intervention: Drug: Tamoxifen

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
28
December 2012
December 2011   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients previously diagnosed with bladder cancer who have already received 1-2 systemic therapy regimens (chemotherapy or biological therapy or both) but including at least one chemotherapy regimen.
  • Patients who have had the cancer spread to other parts of the body.
  • Patients must have adequate liver function.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients who have uncontrolled nervous system metastasis
  • Patients who are pregnant
  • Patients who have had systemic therapies within the past 4 weeks
  • Patients who plan to have major surgery within 2 weeks
  • Patients who have Grade III/IV heart problems
  • Patients who have severe and/or uncontrolled medical disease.
  • Patients who might be at high risk for deep vein thrombosis
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Italy,   United States
 
 
NCT00710970
H-16848
Yes
Not Provided
Not Provided
Seth Lerner, Baylor College of Medicine
Seth Lerner
  • AstraZeneca
  • Cytogen Corporation
Principal Investigator: Seth P. Lerner, M.D. Baylor College of Medicine
Baylor College of Medicine
July 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP