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Effect of Supplementary Vitamins on Oxidant Gene Expression in the Lungs of Healthy Smokers

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00565214
First Posted: November 29, 2007
Last Update Posted: May 25, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
November 27, 2007
November 29, 2007
May 25, 2017
September 2007
December 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
The effects of the supplements on gene expression [ Time Frame: After 30 days of intervention ]
To test whether 1 month of dietary antioxidant vitamin supplements alter the expression in lung epithelial cells of genes related to oxidant response.
F2-isoprostane and vitamin levels from blood and urine; Selenium from toenail sample; To observe vitamin induced fold-changed in airway epithelial oxidant-related genes known to be up- or down- regulated by cigarette smoking. [ Time Frame: After 30 days of intervention ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00565214 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Vitamin supplementation [ Time Frame: After 30 days of intervention ]
    The ability of vitamin supplementation to raise lung and serum vitamin levels will be evaluated.
  • Oxidant stress in the lung. [ Time Frame: After 30 days of intervention ]
    The levels of oxidant stress in the lung will be evaluated.
  • Changes in airway epithelial gene expression in genes other than oxidant related genes. [ Time Frame: After 30 days of intervention ]
    To determine whether the vitamin supplementation can induce changes in airway epithelial gene expression in genes other than oxidant related genes.
Dietary Questionnaire; Smoking Questionnaire [ Time Frame: Completed on Day 0 ]
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Effect of Supplementary Vitamins on Oxidant Gene Expression in the Lungs of Healthy Smokers
Effect of Supplementary Vitamins on Oxidant Gene Expression in the Lungs of Healthy Smokers

Smoking damages the airway epithelium. The major mechanism by which this is done is by molecules called free radicals. Our body attempts to deal with these damaging molecules in two ways. One mechanism is via the presence of protective anti-oxidant vitamins and the other is via proteins that are produced by the body to convert free radicals to safer, less reactive molecules. Vitamins in our diet play a significant role in antioxidant defenses by directly neutralizing the damaging free-radicals and by providing co-factors to cellular proteins that neutralize the free radicals. This project is designed to look at the effects of giving individuals supplemental vitamins to see if it improves their defenses against oxidant insults. The investigators plan to look at the effects of these supplements over a 30 day period and monitor the effects by measuring vitamin levels in the blood and in the lung, and by measuring the response of cells in the lung through the increase or decrease in expression of genes responsive to oxidants.

To participate in this protocol, the research subject should first be enrolled in Weill-IRB protocol #0005004439 entitled "Evaluation of the Lungs of Normal (Smokers, Ex-smokers, Non-Smokers) Individuals with Segmental Bronchopulmonary Lung Lavage, Bronchial Brushing, and Bronchial Wall Biopsy", fulfilling the inclusion/exclusion criteria of that protocol. They will be invited to participate in this Vitamin protocol only if they meet the additional inclusion/exclusion criteria of this protocol.

The purpose of this study is to test whether dietary antioxidant supplementation can alter the expression in lung epithelial cells of genes related to oxidant response and whether this response is dependent on factors such as the individual's baseline serum antioxidant status, dietary antioxidant status, and the oxidant/anti-oxidant balance in the lung. The underlying hypothesis is that the intake of vitamins with antioxidant properties (selenomethionine, vitamin E and vitamin C) will boost the antioxidant levels of the airway epithelium sufficient to protect the epithelium from the stress of oxidants in cigarette smoke. Our prior work shows that phenotypic normal smokers (cigarette smokers with normal history, physical exam, lung function tests, and chest x-rays) have marked up and down regulation of > ~200 genes in the airway epithelium. The proposed project will build on past findings by examining whether regulation of gene expression responds to changes in nutritional status. The primary aim will be assessment of gene expression of the airway epithelium (from protocol #0005004439 entitled "Evaluation of the Lungs of Normal (Smokers, Ex-smokers, Non-Smokers) Individuals with Segmental Bronchopulmonary Lung Lavage, Bronchial Brushing, and Bronchial Wall Biopsy") obtained before and after taking standard amounts of selenomethionine, vitamin E and vitamin C, or placebo for 30 days. The secondary aims will be to evaluate the ability of vitamin supplementation to raise lung and serum vitamin levels, to reduce the oxidant stress in the lung and systemically (as measured by lung and urinary F2 isoprostane levels, respectively), and to assess the vitamin-induced change in airway epithelial gene expression in genes other than oxidant related genes.
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  • Dietary Supplement: Group 1
    The treatment plan involves the administration of a combination of 3 vitamins (vitamin C 1000 mg, vitamin E 400 IU, selenomethionine 400 μg) to study volunteers in a 2:1 randomization, Vitamins are to be taken orally, once a day, for a duration of 30 days.
    Other Name: Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium
  • Dietary Supplement: Group 2
    The treatment plan involves the administration of a combination of 3 placebos to be taken orally, once daily for a duration of 30 days.
    Other Name: Placebo
  • Active Comparator: Group 1
    On Day 1, Group 1 will initiate in a double-blinded fashion, a once daily vitamin combination of selenomethionine(400 μg), vitamin E(400 IU), and vitamin C (1000 mg) orally for 30 days at home. After 30 days of treatment with Vitamin supplements, the gene expression of the airway epithelium will be compared to that of the Placebo group.
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: Group 1
  • Placebo Comparator: Group 2
    On Day 1, Group 2 will initiate the placebo in a double-blinded fashion.
    Intervention: Dietary Supplement: Group 2
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
46
October 2010
December 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All study individual should be enrolled in Weill-IRB protocol #0005004439 entitled "Evaluation of the Lungs of Normal (Smokers, Ex-smokers, Non-Smokers) Individuals with Segmental Bronchopulmonary Lung Lavage, Bronchial Brushing, and Bronchial Wall Biopsy."
  • All study subjects should be able to provide informed consent.
  • Males or females ages 18 years and older.
  • Current smokers with at least a 15 pack-year history (1 pack year = on average 20 cigarettes per day for 1 year).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Drug and/or alcohol abuse within the past six months.
  • Individuals already on supplemental vitamins.
  • Subjects intending to quit smoking in the next 30 days.
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00565214
0705009179
No
Not Provided
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Ronald G Crystal, MD Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
May 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP